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motohead89
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   Posted 12/22/2011 8:20 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I first thought it was the battery. But then I used a different battery and it still died. I would charge a battery install it and ride it somewhere. When I drive it back (second time driving after charging battery) it died on me right when I got home. This happened with both batteries. I was thinking it is the alternator because isn't it supposed to charge a battery while riding?
Because these batteries would die while riding home.
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Andy VH
Where is the earth shattering kaboom!?



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   Posted 12/22/2011 9:19 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
The alternator does charge the battery while riding as long as the alternator output, after the voltage regulator is about 14.5 volts. But that is also engine speed dependent. On most bikes the engine has to be spinning about 1/3 range to mid-range of the rpm range to spin the alternator fast enough to create the right output from the voltage regulator. Since you say the bike dies after you get it home seems to indicate no charging voltage is getting to the battery. The bike is totally running off the battery and some meager output of the alternator.

If you have access to a volt/ohmeter, attach it to the battery terminals (after again charging the battery), and then start the bike and note the voltage at the battery. At idle it should be 12 volt to about 13.5 volts. Then slowly rev the engine up to about 3,000 rpm. You should see the voltage across the battery increase to over 14 volts. If it does not change, then you have a problem with the voltage regulator most likely. But if the voltage regulator is ok, then it could be the voltage rectifier or even an open circuit in the alternator. Voltage rectifiers either work, or they don't work. You can check the three phases of the alternator resistance (those are the three big yellow wires in the wiring harness from the engine) with an ohmeter. If any of them show infinite resistance it indicates an open circuit in one of the three phases and the alternator is likely shot.

BUT! Never forget to check the ground wire for the rectifier! Make sure it is clean, corrosion free and properly grounded. A faulty ground wire at the rectifier means one or more phases of the alternator output may be lost.

How long did you charge the battery? A brand new battery should take 12 hours minimum to fully charge at a rate of 10% of the rated amperage of the battery.

Oh, and THE #1 RULE when asking for ANY mechanical assistance on ANY bike: Tell us the make, model, age, modifications, 1-owner or 5th owner, etc, etc. Too much detail is never too much. When you give us no details all we can do is guess if you're talking about a 1964 Ducati 250 Diana or a 1996 Suzuki Katana 600 or 2006 Harley Sportster 1200.


Training, the best safety and performance "equipment" you can get!
Get MSF trained, check out: http://www.msf-usa.org
 

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Andy VH
Where is the earth shattering kaboom!?



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Date Joined Apr 2005
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   Posted 12/22/2011 9:29 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Well, I take some of that back. I checked your profile and I see you posted about similar problems back in May on a Yamaha R6.

And yes, a weak electrical system will cause ALL kinds of engine running/sputtering/spitting/stalling problems.

So will a messed up fueling system if the fuel tank, carbs/fuel injection has not been properly set up and REALLY cleaned (not just pur fuel cleaner through it). But it sounds like you may have more electrical issues than fuel issues, for now. Get the electrical issues fixed and see what else comes up.

Based on what I read there, and what you're asking here, I'll suggest two things:
1. If you want to fix this yourself, buy a Haynes or Clymer service manual, about $25 to $30. Then also buy yourself a decent volt/ohmeter for about $30 to $50. That is the minimum you'll need to diagnose some of the potential faults.
2. Take the bike to a qualified mechanic, or at least to a buddy who really knows, and UNDERSTANDS how engines and motorcycles work. If he ever says "I dunno how it works but we can replace this and see what happens" leave him and get to a real qualified wrench.

Two options. One at minimum will cost you $60 to $100, IF you really know what you are doing. The other, will cost you at minimum $100 for a decent shop just to diagnose what is wrong, and then add $$$ from there.


Training, the best safety and performance "equipment" you can get!
Get MSF trained, check out: http://www.msf-usa.org
 

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Easy Rider 2
Central Illinois / Central Florida

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   Posted 12/24/2011 4:03 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
motohead89 said...
I was thinking it is the alternator because isn't it supposed to charge a battery while riding?
Because these batteries would die while riding home.
Yes.......maybe.
The "new" battery must be charged thoroughly BEFORE being put into service.
 
The charging system in a bike is not all one unit like a car.
There is an alternator (stator) and a seperately connected regulator/rectifier.
 
Some simple voltage measurements will show you if the charging system is working or not.
If you can charge it up and ride it to a bike or battery shop, they will test it for you for little or no $$$.
 
 


'06 Suzuki S50 (VS800)
'07 Honda Shadow VLX 600
 

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