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Vstar0081
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   Posted 5/19/2005 4:32 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I ride a Vstar 650 Classic to work every morning. I have noticed that I need to use the choke to get the bike started when its cold. I have a few questions about warming up the bile..

How long do I need to warm up the bike in the morning and evening when I am coming back? The bike will not pick up speed that quickly unless it has warmed up.. I can understand that.

second, is it ok to keep the choke on during warmup or should I turn it off after a few seconds? I just wanna make sure that I am not damaging the engine by keeping the choke on for too long.

Thanks for all you help.
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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 5/19/2005 5:46 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Typically I start with the choke and warm up about a minute or two (depending on the temperature) and then ride off gently with the choke on. After about a mile the engine is warm enough to push the choke in most of the way and after two miles all the way. During this time I accelerate gently, and keep the RPMs down to about 1/3 of redline. After another mile of riding slightly less gently (maybe 1/2 of redline max) it's warmed up enough to ride a little harder: perhaps 3/4 redline max. After 4 to 5 miles it's fully warmed up and I am comfortable winding it all the way up and accelerating hard.

Your engine will be a bit different, and so you have to listen to it to know how it's doing. As it gets warmer it will get tighter and quieter, and the fuel mixture will improve so you'll feel it get more responsive. If you pay attention, it will tell you how hard you can work it without straining, slapping, or bogging.

What you do not want to do is let it idle in the driveway for 5 or 10 minutes with the choke on. If you do that it will start fouling the plugs and depositing carbon on the valves, pistons, and combustion chambers. This is bad news on a V-Twin, and you'll find yourself running on only one cylinder.
 
On really cold mornings (in the 30's and low 40's), I'll preheat the engine in the garage with a 500 watt heatlamp; which makes it easier to start and speeds the warm-up drill quite a bit.


Cadd
2004 Nomad 1500
VROC #11619  Rolling Blunder #128

 

Post Edited (CaddmannQ) : 5/20/2005 12:49:06 AM GMT

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stock28
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   Posted 5/19/2005 8:35 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I'll pull the choke all the way out and then hit the starter. Then I'll start pushing the choke in as far as I can and have the motor still run smooth. Leave it there while I put on my jacket, helmet, gloves, etc. Usually about two minutes. Close the choke completely and rev the throttle a bit to check for smooth response. As soon as it responds normal you're good to go. If it's colder, you may need to leave the choke out a little longer or give it an extra minute or two. As others have said, don't leave it running for ten minutes with the choke on.
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Smitty
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   Posted 5/19/2005 11:49 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Remember all bikes are a bit different. So what you need to do to baby your bike in starting will be something your learn about the bike & keep in mind. Also it can be so different like on a cool day compared to it being the start of a darn hot day.

So you have to get the feel of your bike. They have their differences & I am told they are just like women though as a bachelor I really have not considered a bike to a woman.

Of my three bikes only one is with carbs being a Yamaha YZF600r compred to the other two with fuel injection & so easy to start up.

The 600 requires full choke & just a minor touch with the throttle to get it started. After a few seconds I will ease down the choke a bit & be ready to blip the throttle rather then let it die. After around a minute the bike is down to no choke & engine running well. Still on cooler mornings I will sometimes take off with choke 1/4 open & within a block I will have put the choke fully down THOUGH I will not run any of my engines hard at the start to even the first numerous blocks.


Remember all the others on the road are crazy & out to kill you.

Post Edited (Smitty) : 5/20/2005 6:54:30 AM GMT

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intechpc
2001 FXDX - MSF Certified



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   Posted 5/20/2005 4:47 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

Generally, the process I follow is pretty simple.  If it's cold I start the bike at full choke and let it run for about 30 seconds.  Then I'll dial down the choke so that the bike is idling at 1,000 RPM.  At this point I start riding.  Once the engine is running well enough that it will idle just under 1,000 RPM (I can check it at stops or if I won't be stopping I do it just by knowing how the engine sounds) I take the choke all the way off.

I can't speak specifically for your bike but I think in general you want to get riding right away as Cadd mentioned.  Harley actually tells you how long to ride and how to set the choke based on temp.  The key being they tell you to ride right away.


2001 Harley-Davidson Dyna Super Glide Sport (FXDX)
Jet and Breather kit
Sampson Street Sweeper Exhaust
HD Sissy Bar and Big Bag Saddle bags

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Emre
Suzuki Bandit 600S, Aprilia SR50



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   Posted 5/20/2005 8:16 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I have a 600 cc inline 4 cyl. engine.

I first start the bike at full choke. While the engine is screaming around 3-4K, I wear my helmet, gloves, do my preride checks. (Brakes, tires, turn signals, horn, etc...) At the point when I hear that the engine RPM gets a bit higher than the start, I turn to half(?) choke and let the bike idle around 1200. Then If I'm in a hurry I start riding, after a mile or two I close the choke; if not, I just chill and wait :)

The process is pretty much the same in every type of weather for me.

Edit: I check the oil before starting the bike of course! :p
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GeoffG
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   Posted 5/20/2005 9:01 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Use the choke to start the bike, then reduce as needed. As Cadd says, you can ride the bike (easy on the throttle!) on partial choke, but I like to get it off as soon as I can. Warm up the bike with some gentle riding--letting it idle in the driveway for minutes on end is not really so good for it...
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1Hawk
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   Posted 5/20/2005 10:01 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

Harley XL1200R, enrichner out, twist the throttle, hit the run switch, fire the bike and off in 10 seconds.

Yamaha FZ6, turn key, hit run switch, fire the bike and off in ten seconds.

 

Yamaha DT400B, pray, start the bike, let it ying ying for a minute and ride like hell, then do some more praying.....

 

Warm your bike up while riding easy for the first mile or so.  Idling when it is cold only fouls things up.

 

Hawk


In Nature, as in Society, most Creatures are Friendly.  The Secret, is Knowing those that are Not.  Therefore, Knowledge becomes the Key to Understanding.

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Vstar0081
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   Posted 5/20/2005 10:11 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Thanks a lot every one..that was really helpful...I can see the things I was doing wrong...ANother rrealted issue is that my commute is really short, may be about a couple of miles. So I don't know if the bike fully warms up by the time I get to work. The throttle response after a few blocks is pretty smooth so I guess it does warm up..should I be concerned about riding a bike to work every day when it is not fully warmed up by the end of my drive? Maybe I need to increase the commute by taking a longer route to work so that the bike warms up..which by the way, I do not mind at all because with my schedule thats all the riding I get to do these days...once again thanks for all your help guys..I really appreciate it.. :-)
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1Hawk
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   Posted 5/20/2005 11:05 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

Anything under 3 miles and you would be better off on a bicycle as the motorcycle will barely have time to reach operating temps.  If this were my Sporty, the oil wouldn't make it past the 100 degree mark in 3 miles.  Leave early, get a bit more saddle time in and enjoy the ride.  I live 8 miles from the station but it's 12 miles the way I go on backroads.  No traffic, quiet and a few good twisties to play with too....

 

Like I said, enjoy the ride.......

 

Hawk


In Nature, as in Society, most Creatures are Friendly.  The Secret, is Knowing those that are Not.  Therefore, Knowledge becomes the Key to Understanding.

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intechpc
2001 FXDX - MSF Certified



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   Posted 5/20/2005 1:37 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I'm with 1Hawk on this, find a longer route to ride to work.  Those short trips aren't even going to get the engine to full operating temperature.  It can take as long as 15 minutes of riding for the bike to get completely warmed up (depending on the bike, engine and weather conditions).  If you can find a way to stretch your commute to at least 10 minutes of solid riding time you'd probably be much better off.  If you can't stretch the ride, just make sure you get out regularly (aside from your commute) and give it some good long rides.


2001 Harley-Davidson Dyna Super Glide Sport (FXDX)
Jet and Breather kit
Sampson Street Sweeper Exhaust
HD Sissy Bar and Big Bag Saddle bags

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Smitty
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   Posted 5/20/2005 2:50 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I to am with Hawk & remember each time you hit the starter that is a big drain on the battery. So try to get to where you can have the bike running 30 minutes or more at around 3 thou or higher. Otherwise obtain a Battery Tender (trade name) & come a few months from now you will be most thankful as you do not find the bike failing to start at home, at work or where-ever. Yes even in the hotter weather for the heat is hard on the battery as well.


Remember all the others on the road are crazy & out to kill you.

Post Edited (Smitty) : 5/21/2005 12:44:58 AM GMT

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1Hawk
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   Posted 5/20/2005 3:40 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

So true Smitty.  Great thought....

 

Hawk


In Nature, as in Society, most Creatures are Friendly.  The Secret, is Knowing those that are Not.  Therefore, Knowledge becomes the Key to Understanding.

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Smitty
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   Posted 5/20/2005 5:49 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Hawk we really are bubbling with info are we not? Well at least we are feeding fellow riders some good info for in many cases WE suffered due to similiar errors & there was no info to warn us, let alone the net & m/c programs like this. Then you have to dial into Ask Motoman & again you find a lot of info that just a few are handeling so well. Makes this board one worth while coming to & reading.


Remember all the others on the road are crazy & out to kill you.

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 5/20/2005 5:58 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
As stated, 2 or 3 miles is not enough. You'll be polluting your oil with moisture and combustion byproducts that will be trapped there and not evaporate off before you stop the engine. These will sit in the oil and form acids that eat away at the metal, and form sludgy gunk that will gum up the oiling system.

You really should limit such short rides to absolute necessities, and always ride the bike untill the engine is fully warm, and then some more to evaporate those pollutants and burn them out through the crankcase vent.


Cadd
2004 Nomad 1500
VROC #11619  Rolling Blunder #128

 

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1Hawk
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   Posted 5/20/2005 11:20 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

Cadd Said,

"As stated, 2 or 3 miles is not enough. You'll be polluting your oil with moisture and combustion byproducts that will be trapped there and not evaporate off before you stop the engine. These will sit in the oil and form acids that eat away at the metal, and form sludgy gunk that will gum up the oiling system.

You really should limit such short rides to absolute necessities, and always ride the bike untill the engine is fully warm, and then some more to evaporate those pollutants and burn them out through the crankcase vent.

 
While this is very true and considering many new riders and some old still use Dyno oil, it does not hold true for those of us that use the pure synthetic oils although moisture is still an issue.  I think the important part of the message us old farts are trying to point out is short rides do not offer an ability for the engine to properly warm up and this is vital to a long life.  So, if you're thinking of riding your bike 3-5 miles back and forth to the store or work, don't, take your bicycle, practice countersteering and save some money because those short rides will eventually catch up with you from a maintenance standpoint.
 
Good point Cadd.....
 
Hawk


In Nature, as in Society, most Creatures are Friendly.  The Secret, is Knowing those that are Not.  Therefore, Knowledge becomes the Key to Understanding.

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