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lionlady
-----Mistress of Novices. -Total miles: 85,000+



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   Posted 9/18/2006 2:02 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Since we regularly recommend a dozen or so book titles, about riding, it seems logical that there be a sticky dedicated to them.
 
DataDan has offered to get things started, but I'm jumping in with...


  Youth and talent are no match for age and treachery. 

Post Edited (lionlady) : 9/18/2006 9:05:36 PM GMT

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lionlady
-----Mistress of Novices. -Total miles: 85,000+



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   Posted 9/18/2006 2:04 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Covering the Basics: "Proficient Motorcycling," and "MORE Proficient Motorcycling," by David Hough. Great first reads, while you're waiting to take the MSF or even if you already have. I personally think that these should be handed out to everyone signing up for any basic riders course.

P


  Youth and talent are no match for age and treachery. 

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DataDan
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   Posted 9/21/2006 11:10 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

The Motorcycle Safety Foundation’s Guide to Motorcycling Excellence—Second Edition

192 pages, $24.95

DataDan’s rating: ****

If you’re like most new motorcyclists (including me many years ago), you’re finding that for every question you find an answer to, two or three more pop up. What kind of bike should I get? What should I look for in a helmet and other riding gear? How do get the knowledge and skills I need to ride safely? Each of these questions opens up a realm of knowledge you might not have been aware of before you decided to take up motorcycling. What you need, you say to yourself, is a basic source of knowledge on many aspects of the sport. Enter MSF’s Guide to Motorcycling Excellence.

For those who don’t know about MSF, it is the Motorcycle Safety Foundation, a non-profit organization supported by motorcycle manufacturers. MSF designs the motorcycle training curriculum used in most states, and they train the trainers. They also have written an excellent introductory book. The first edition of Motorcycling Excellence, published in 1995, was very good and came at a time when few riding technique books were to be found. The updated 2005 second edition improves on the original with additional material and broader focus.

The main focus of Motorcycling Excellence is, of course, riding. Like MSF training, the book starts out with the most basic knowledge: where the controls are, what they do, and how they work. But it progresses quickly into the techniques and strategies you need to survive on the street. Chapter 7, "Street Strategies & the Visual Edge", chapter 8, "Street Strategies At Work", and chapter 9, "Special Situations", are the heart of the book. While much of the material covered in those chapters overlaps with the MSF’s Basic RiderCourse, it complements the course with more depth.

But the book’s real strength lies beyond the course basics. Chapter 5, "Protective Riding Gear" will answer questions about helmets and apparel. Chapter 6, "Inspection, Care, & Troubleshooting" explains the inspections and adjustments needed to make sure your motorcycle is in safe running order. Chapter 10, "Group Riding" introduces practices to make a group ride run smoothly. For those interested in more technical aspects of riding, chapter 12, "The Traction-Pie Analogy" and chapter 13, "Countersteering" get into nuts and bolts that will help you get the most out of your riding. The book also includes a 9-page glossary defining nearly 200 motorcycling terms.

An innovation that distinguishes the second edition of Motorcycling Excellence from its predecessor is a series of sidebars by prominent motorcyclists covering topics that, in some cases, go well beyond the basics:

  • Nick Ienatsch (moto-journalist and author of Sport Riding Techniques) on choosing a first bike. A 6-page piece covering the different styles of motorcycles available and factors a new rider should consider.

  • Kevin Schwantz (former 500GP world champion) on safety gear.

  • Paul Thede (Race Tech) on suspension technology.

  • Erik Buell (Buell Motorcycle Company) on suspension geometry.

  • Keith Code (California Superbike School) on countersteering.

  • Freddie Spencer (former 250 and 500GP world champion) on trail-braking.

Motorcycling Excellence isn’t just a good newbie book; it’s a good book for riders at any experience level. Though it covers a wide range of topics with different degrees of sophistication, it’s organized to allow a reader to find what he needs now and leave the rest for later. Printed on heavy stock and lavishly illustrated with color photos and drawings. DataDan gives it four stars.

edit, 1/24/09: updated link


A superior rider uses superior judgment to avoid problems that would demand his superior skill.

Post Edited (DataDan) : 1/24/2009 11:24:46 PM GMT

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jsanford
'07 BMW F800ST, '08 M695, '04 Moto Guzzi Breva...



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   Posted 10/15/2006 4:25 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
If you're a bit of a propellor head, I recommend Motorcycle Roadcraft: The Police Rider's Handbook. As it's a professional text, it has a non-nonsense approach and facts backing up their recommendations and strategies.

The diagrams are reversed since this is a UK book.


Newbodometer: 4713 miles

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Emmet
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   Posted 12/13/2006 2:13 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
At the bookstore, I had to choose between MSF's book and Proficient Motorcycling.

I chose MSF, because it was a 2005 updated book, concentrating on learning. P.M. had a little too much biography on motorcycles, nothing I need to know. Both were $25

MSF seems more helpful in their diagrams and side notes. Great Read!


Remember: No matter where you go, there you are.

-Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome

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duldul
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   Posted 1/11/2007 4:04 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
@ datadan

it is a good information to me because i'm a newbies abotu motorcycles


ATV tire : used polaris ATV : polaris ATV tire

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AnesMerc
Mercenary



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   Posted 1/14/2007 2:25 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Not a book, but I purchased the Ride Like A Pro series, by Jerry "Motorman" Palladino. I got the basic vid "Learn to ride the easy way" as well as the next one "Ride Like A Pro IV" the next one. I am glad I got both. The first was very basic for the non-rider, a good review, but I have ridden before so the next one was very helpful in stepping up the skills I needed.
http://www.ridelikeapro.com/
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flickmeister
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   Posted 6/9/2007 3:01 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Man,

I can't believe no one mentioned what I feel is the best book ever written on motorcycle riding techniques. That is Nick Ienatsch's "Sport Riding Techniques." ISBN # 1893618072. It sells for a paltry $16.47 at Amazon.com. I guarantee you if you buy it and Hough's "MORE Proficient Motorcycling," you will have the best material ever written about how to ride. BTW, I like Hough's "MORE Proficient Motorcycling" better than the original because it covers all of the good stuff in the first edition plus some more advanced techniques. If you buy both at the same time, you can also get free shipping. Hough's book is ISBN # 1931993033 and sells for $16.47. It'll be the best $33 you will ever spend as long as you ride. Hope this helps. Cheers, Jack
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JEdwards
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   Posted 3/17/2008 4:37 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Lee Park's 'Total Control' is an excellent book with great exercises in it. Borders, B&N, and Amazon all carry it. Kind of steep at around $26.00, but really a great read! It is also a good prep if you want to take one of his classes.


If you want to be immortal, be a teacher - Aristotle.

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Ken C
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   Posted 1/24/2009 12:23 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Excellent suggestions. My library contains all of the books mentioned above plus "Stayin' Safe" by Larry Grodsky (RIP) and Reg Pridmore's "Smooth Riding".


Riding in the Zone
http://www.ridinginthezone.com
http://tonystrackdays.com

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GAJ
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   Posted 1/24/2009 12:27 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Rode pillion on Reg's bike years ago at Sear Point...the man was smoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooth as we passed most everyone on the track...and I couldn't feel him shift a gear.

Scared the bejeezus outta me though I knew I was in no danger; I HATE pillion...much more frightening than riding.
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Ken C
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   Posted 1/24/2009 2:02 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I occasionally give rides to people (usually girlfriends of track day participants) at the track day organization I instruct for. I try to be sensitive to the passenger and the best way to make them comfortable is to do as Reg does... be smooth!


Riding in the Zone
www.ridinginthezone.com
tonystrackdays.com

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