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lionlady
-----Mistress of Novices. -Total miles: 85,000+



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   Posted 8/4/2007 9:28 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
>>From Sportbikes.net forums, posted by "Fargin_Bastige"
>This is very well stated and covers just about all the key issues.

1. Don't simply validate, EXPLAIN: If you are teaching something, the idea is not to validate something and move on, it's to provide the reasoning, concepts and FACTS behind the idea.

2. If you use the words "I think" or "I feel" in front of your answer, you should take a step back and research what you're talking about before answering.

3. If you've been riding for less than 36 months, don't give advice without letting people know that. Between months 1 and 36 you are most likely to get into an accident and the highest risk time is the period between months 12-36.

4. Always start from ground zero. Assume that the person asking has no clue, regardless.

5. Just because someone rode a bike 20 years ago doesn't mean its wise to consider any displacement engine. Returning riders are crashing their brains out and dying due to their propensity to over buy. Trust me on this one newbs, my 93 GSXR750 racebike was far slower than any 600 you can buy off of the floor nowadays. I looked up the speeds for an AMA winning superbike from 1990 and it was slower than any current literbike you can buy. Technology takes huge leaps each year and so do the speeds.

6. Motorcycling is LEARNED, not natural. Being a "natural athelete" is irrelevant to riding safely. It is a learned skill that is hugely mental. The physical aspect comes into play, but more so on the track than on the street. Stressing the mental aspect of riding is the key to properly conveying the message.

7. Learn your topic. If you’re going to advise, have the teacher's edition handy. There's a ton of info out there and you obviously have the internet. Use it and research.

8. Know that every "newbie" is the same. Regardless of protestations of difference, everyone is subject to the same issues. Doesn't matter if Michael Schumacher showed up and said he'd never ridden a bike before or Joe Blow off of the street. Both cases would be from ZERO and they would both face the same challenges and issues for a new rider.

There seems to be a thought process (mostly from prospective new riders) that if someone is regarded as mature, or IS more mature, they will somehow be safer. This is incorrect. Even if someone practices restraint on a throttle, it doesn't mean they're mitigating all risk. It goes back to learning. If you've ridden for any length of time, you know that throttle is not everything.

IMHO 50% of the time, it's the situation you're put in on the street that's the most challenging. What part of the lane do I ride in? Does that car ahead look like it's going to cut in front of me? I am approaching an intersection, what am I looking for? These few examples (and there are thousands of others) are what I run into every time I ride and none of them involve speeding. Speeding actually isn't as big of a killer as everyone makes it out to be. Loss of control is far more common.

In short, everyone is subject to the same learning curve when starting.

9. Think twice about passing advice you've been given. If it sounds stupid, it probably is. This is a rash on our sport and should be treated as such. So, no more flipping over the handlebars when grabbing the front brake comments and the like.

10. Respect for the machine has little to do with learning. We often use the word respect when riding a bike. Why would respect have anything to do with it? Riding a bike is a mental process. When you first learned math, did the teacher put the book down in front of you and you learned it by respecting it?

Respect is BS. If you hammer the throttle in a corner on a big bike, you'll probably go down. That's not due to lack of respect, that's cause and effect. Everything you do has a reaction that can be positive or negative. If you LEARN properly, you should get the positive reaction.
 
Pick the right learning tool (smaller bike) and learn the proper technique (MSF and ongoing education). In short, you don't learn through respect in any other discipline, why should it be different on a bike?
_________________


  Youth and talent are no match for age and treachery. 

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manchestersparky
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   Posted 8/5/2007 6:03 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Two Thumbs up !!
Very solid Advice.
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LasVegasLadybug
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   Posted 12/28/2007 6:54 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Having my endorsement for over 20+ years, (17 years without riding), when I first bought a new bike, I went with a Honda Rebel 250cc. I was a bit apprehensive after that many years of not riding. I now ride a GEORGEOUS American Iron Horse Slammer (1800cc) with no fear, but plenty of caution. As for any advice I would ever dispense to anyone, it is take the MSF rider course!! I'm not an instructor and I don't play one on TV (or in real life).
I love riding and my (adult) kids share my love. They took the class, too. It's so well taught, working on the assumption that ALL students in the class know NOTHING about riding a motorcycle. I learned a technique or two that really helped boost my ability!
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Paratrooperwife
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   Posted 1/5/2008 6:38 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

Great advice!

I too would have only one recommendation for anyone, and that is take the rider's safety course before going out on the road.

Debbie (Paratrooperwife)

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Short Man
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   Posted 5/9/2009 4:35 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

"Being a "natural athelete" is irrelevant to riding safely. It is a learned skill that is hugely mental."

 you answered one of my questions about cycling right there.

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DJS
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   Posted 7/22/2009 11:24 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Great advise!  I am new going on into the 12 to 36 month range, the high risk one.  Kissed my first curb the other day and got by with just some scuffs to the pipe and frame and a nasty stain on the seat.  I'm shocked by some of the advise I get from people at work that don't even ride anymore.  Things like a helmit will only cut your vision and you don't need one if your good.  One lady suggested practice riding on loose sand, one guy suggested a few drinks were good to relax your nerves.  I get all ginds of great ideas from people that don't ride.
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Jamsie
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   Posted 1/22/2010 10:52 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Wonderful advice for a new rider. THANKS for posting!
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Andy VH
Where is the earth shattering kaboom!?



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   Posted 7/15/2010 5:35 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
All great info. As a 38 year rider and 17 year MSF instructor, I get frustrated with a lot of the online instruction offerred by whoever decides they know enough to teach someone else. Or anyone with a video recorder and a bike is now a youtube cycle instructor. Some of it is good, some of it is actually useable in addition to the MSF teachings, plus the MSF teachings are not all inclusive and gospel. But, we MSF instructors are trained as rider coaches with very specific background in how to teach a skill and really explain it. A lot of it, and a lot of other riders teaching others may not have the knowledge of why or how something is done, in a manner to realy teach it.

The idea is not to simply teach by telling someone "do it this way", but to coach/instruct in such a manner that the skill set is understood as to WHY it is done in addition to HOW it is done. For another rider to teach someone else, they have to know the WHY and HOW to describe a skill, rather than just show how to do it. Ortherwise, the instruction would be as useful as a motorcycle trials rider showing someone how to ride over a four foot high boulder by just doing it and saying "do it like this!"


Training, the best safety and performance "equipment" you can get!
Get MSF trained, check out: http://www.msf-usa.org
 

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RaptorFA
'11 Suzuki GSX1250FA



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   Posted 6/19/2011 9:48 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

Very good stuff here. As a newbie I understand where you are coming from. The MSF course was the best thing I ever could have done, and I may just do more in the near future. My riding coach said if I had questions or concerns to follow up with her and I actually have. At this point it feels right to ask those that coached me!

However, there is always that initial disconnect when you mount your new bike for the first time at the dealership and you have that first "solo" flight. What I did was found an empty parking lot and spent 2 hours there re-doing virtually every drill from the class multiple times. Well, that is except for the running over stuff! It was a great way for us to get to know each other. And I still do the drills, as this is where I can find the things that I need to focus on more and what to ask my coach. I fully believe that the art of riding is something that you never stop learning about.

As for the bike selection, I just couldn't do a 600, they just didn't fit me. In that respect I ended up choosing a Suzuki GSX1250FA. This bike just fit me in every way; the seat height, the ergos, the placement of controls, everything. I would much rather have a bike that fits than one I have to fight because I am struggling with being in the wrong position on the machine or fumbling with controls that aren't to my spec. But very strong post!

This was my experience and mine alone. In no way shape or form do I tender this as advice! The only thing I would recommend to anyone is to take the training. It made all the difference for me.


Regards -
 
RaptorFA
Play Hard, Ride Safe

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Deacon Blues
The Imaginary Director



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   Posted 9/3/2011 3:17 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I think the term 'respect the bike' comes about because there's the tendency for people to get complacent over time as they gain confidence.

They may slack off on emergency stop drills, or low-speed drills. They may begin to not be as vigilant in traffic. They may begin to heed (and follow!) the call of the Sausage Creature, and twist the throttle a bit too hard or not brake early enough going into turns.

We use the term 'respect' when talking about horses, or trained circus animals. They may seem to be less and less scary as we become familiar with their behavior... but there's always that potential, if you cross the line with them, they will bite you. So you never get close to the line.

The same holds for bikes. Never take something for granted, never get complacent or cocky. As you get better and better with your riding, the line will move, but you never try and push it except under specific conditions (a Rider Course or a track school, for example).

Respect the bike.


-------
Don't let Frank see that, or he'll make us put it in the movie.

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Koneko
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   Posted 10/12/2011 7:08 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Way to rain on the parade of arrogance! I am a new rider. and i know pretty much nothing. I haven't had the money or time to take a course and I don't think you'll hate me if I say that your post was up front and obviously meant for some specific people. And said people probably looked like this after reading that freaked .
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Easy Rider 2
Central Illinois / Central Florida

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   Posted 10/12/2011 12:28 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Koneko said...
Way to rain on the parade of arrogance!
Several people have posted in this thread.
Which one of them are you talking about.....or to ??
 
I'm having a little problem figuring out exactly what you are trying to say.........and whether it's meant as a compliment or an insult.  rolleyes
 
 


 
 

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Koneko
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   Posted 10/12/2011 1:48 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
i'm talkin to lionlady. and it's a compliment. :D
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AtvMinibike
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   Posted 10/25/2011 11:01 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Learning to ride a motorcycle is a process. From deciding that you want to ride, selecting your first motorcycle, learning how to ride — and then ultimately — to improving your riding skills.
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