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one2watch
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   Posted 11/15/2011 9:10 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I just bought a dyna screaming eagle bike. I have a lot of tension when I'm riding. I think the forward pegs are going to take some getting use to .very difficult. while turning .it feels like I'm fighting going wide..people tailgate me cause me to drive faster.what should i do......ive only ridden the thing 3 times
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lionlady
-----Mistress of Novices. -Total miles: 85,000+



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   Posted 11/15/2011 9:31 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Sounds like you should spend some time just putting around a parking lot, getting used to the feel of the bike. Slow turns, faster turns. Braking. You have taken a rider's course, right?

As for the tailgaters, I'll let you in on a secret: Motorcycle speedometers are notoriously "generous" - it says you're doing 35 mph, but you may actually going less than 30. Something to keep in mind. If you feel crowded, pull to the side and let em by.

P


ATGATT: Because walking away in disgust, beats riding away in an ambulance.

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Richard47
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   Posted 11/15/2011 9:41 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I've been riding for a long time and have owned many bikes, but never a 'cruiser'. The first and only time I've ever ridden one was on my brother-in-law's Kawasaki 454, with FF controls and generous fork rake. I was just amazed at how difficult it was to turn into a moderate corner at only 30mph. I say amazed, horrified was more like it and I couldn't wait to get off it. So I feel for you trying to learn on one of those, you have a hard row to hoe.


Toilet Brush Dog Owner

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one2watch
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   Posted 11/15/2011 9:50 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
thank you for ur input. yes i start a safty class this week.Im hoping that will help
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GeoffG
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   Posted 11/15/2011 10:05 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
one2watch said...
I just bought a dyna screaming eagle bike...ive only ridden the thing 3 times

I have to ask...is this your first bike?

If so, is there a particular reason you bought a "dyna screaming eagle bike" to learn on?

I don't want to be condescending, but the fact is...learning to ride is MUCH easier on a smaller, lighter bike. Riding is not like driving a car, for one simple reason--a car doesn't need skill to keep it from falling over. Learning to ride on a large, heavy bike can certainly be done--it's done all the time--but it's definitely NOT the best, safest, or easiest way to learn.

In any case, now that you have the bike, all I can say is: motorcycling, like most sports, is highly dependent on confidence. You need to gain confidence in your riding. You gain confidence by doing it...more importantly, but doing it right; you may want to wait for your course to start (also, they'll put you on a little bike to learn, and it's much easier to gain confidence on a little bike--which is exactly the reason they're recommended for learning). You do not want to become intimidated by your bike before the course even starts...
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one2watch
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   Posted 11/15/2011 10:25 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
thnx 4 ur input
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GAJ
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   Posted 11/15/2011 2:06 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Yeah, I'd be "tense" trying to manhandle that beast with no training whatsoever.

To be honest, after 30 years of riding, I think I'd STILL be tense riding that thing!

I like my bikes under 500lbs which is way below what you're dealing with.

Good luck and take it slow; perhaps within a year after you take the course and get some miles under you belt the tension will ease.


Selling my one owner '97 TL1000S: www.bayarearidersforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=372346

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Andy VH
Where is the earth shattering kaboom!?



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   Posted 11/15/2011 3:12 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
A Dyna Screaming Eagle?? Really? For a 1st bike?

An $18,000+ bike as your first bike? A built up (assuming Screamin Eagle means the engine is not stock) heavy Harley as your first ever bike?

Take the MSF course, and hopefully learn a LOT from it. Then park the Harley. Buy a used $1500 mid-size, mid-90s Japanese standard (plain jane upright) bike, (no sport-bike style at all) and then ride the heck out of it and learn about riding. If you continue on that expensive Harley, you'll be spending a lot on it for repairs when you drop it.


Training, the best safety and performance "equipment" you can get!
Get MSF trained, check out: http://www.msf-usa.org
 

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Smitty
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   Posted 11/16/2011 11:45 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

You will find some honest to gosh posts up above from riders that have been riding for many years.

We had a chap come on this m/c board with a massive HD with all the goodies.  He moaned all the time & I think he only clocked 30 miles on the bike then complained, to the regulars on this board, since no one wanted to buy this almost new costly bike & its extra goodies at a shocking price even when new to the buyer.

HAD he been on before & had he listened to the advise of regulars then he would have learned a lot of what is the ideal bike to become his learner bike.

Another wanted a 1000cc sport bike but said he wanted to ride have this bike 25 yrs down the road & would ride slow at the lst .  After a while he realized things in his mind were so mixed up & simply NO knowledge on the m/c lingo to the makes & models.



Remember all the others on the road are crazy & out to kill you.

Post Edited (Smitty) : 11/24/2011 7:38:33 PM GMT

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louemc
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   Posted 11/16/2011 12:04 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
An Image just flashed into my mind, that had been stored away in deep memory.

A guy that didn't know how to ride a bike, borrowed his friends Harley (Yeah I know, total idiots, passing themselves off as normal's).

This doesn't know he doesn't know how to ride guy, manages to have a head-on collision, so I see him in a hospital bed, in a full body cast, (when I say full, I mean FULL) Have no idea how many broken bones, but, there are wires everywhere, suspending him into a certain position.


 Focus the forces, Be The Force

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wrath186
There's something in your eye. Here let me get it



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   Posted 11/16/2011 2:22 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I'm not going to say that's too much bike for a beginner, but maybe regular traffice isn't the way to go.  When I started learning it was on a Vulcan 750 and it was just around the block.  I don't think I got into regular traffic for weeks just learning to shift and brake.  It reminded me of learning to ride a bicycle when I was a kid. 
 
I took the safety course and even after getting my first bike, a Vulcan 800, a couple of months after I was only riding around side streets and some main streets.  I didn't get on the highway until late September. 
 
My point is you now have the bike, you can either learn to ride it and enjoy it, carefully of course, or you can sell it and get something else.  It's too late to rethink that purchase.   Waaaaaaaaaaaaay too late if you find yourself in trouble in heavy traffic. 
 
My advice is to take baby steps and invest in the absolute best gear you can get. 
 
Hope this helps.


Just once, I'd like to be a puppet master and have nothing go wrong.  Is that too much to ask?

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el SID
merely a man equipped with a bag a seedless grapes



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   Posted 11/16/2011 6:35 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
good point lou.....it does happen....


  the best bike out.... is the one your on...
current hacks
1996 honda vfr
 2012 tuono rsv4 aprc on order baby.... march 2012
1973 kawasaki h1
1998 suzuki rm 125

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one2watch
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   Posted 11/16/2011 7:02 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
thats scary,,thttanks for that
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Smitty
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   Posted 11/19/2011 11:19 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

At our m/c shop of basically British irons, most of the newbies started out on a 125cc two-stroke to later trade it in, not for a Vincent HRD 1000, but for an often used 350cc that we claimed was in prime condition.  A year or so later that is when they went for a used or new 500cc.

Only a few came up with the money for the Vincent HRD & when one thinks of it that 1000 OHV cc ONLY supplied an owner with 49hp!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



Remember all the others on the road are crazy & out to kill you.

Post Edited (Smitty) : 11/27/2011 12:44:35 AM GMT

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louemc
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   Posted 11/20/2011 12:51 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
el SID said...
good point lou.....it does happen....

 
That's almost a perfect example...My frieds head was in the cast as well just holes in the cast for mouth , nose , and eyes.  Could of been to super immobilize the neck...and in an area this guys neck brace wouldn't be enough.
 
I get such a laugh at riders that say a riding school costs too much, and total armored gear costs too much, and isn't the image they want...
 
Guess the doctor and Hospital bills and lost work, and image of this guy in bed is OK though. lol lol lol


 Focus the forces, Be The Force

Post Edited (louemc) : 11/20/2011 7:55:07 PM GMT

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el SID
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   Posted 11/20/2011 5:55 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Agreed Lou, people in general are stupid, using stupid excuses, and when they get hurt, the stupid excuse book comes out. I had to lay it down, cager cut me off while I was tailgating the guy in front of me, yada yada yada. Ya gotta have the gear,got to. I'm thinking about one of those dianese chest and back protectors currently,why? Because I can see a benefit from it, it will add weight,and possibly some heat in the summer. But it will add the ability to possibly walk away should I get clipped by a guy eatin cheerios and smokin cigs while driving his cage on his way to work. I can tell you this,cool isn't the dude in the bed, wrapped up like a enchilada,mouth breathing, gettin fed by his mommy or whatever. Cool is picking your bike up at the scene assessing ridablitiy and moving on. I doubt highly that if you were really clocked you would be walking away,but,a minor accident with no gear,your in the E.R. and on your @ss for a while. And stuff like that happensfar to often,very avoidable. Its only money,I can part with money,I dont want to part with my life.


Best bike out is the one Im on,sod the rest
current hacks


1996 honda vfr
2012 tuono rsv4 aprc on order baby.... march 2012


1973 kawasaki h1

1998 suzuki rm 125

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louemc
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   Posted 11/21/2011 12:56 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I'm Lovin the research that Dianese and AlpineStars are doing, to bring what they do, to their products.

I hope Chest protectors come in a spit version to get built into jackets...put back together with the jackets zipper.

I'm finding Armor extends the comfort zone..as insulation from the Sun's heat, and the Cold air as well.
The heat part needs air flow, so flow needs exit....Air can't flow if it can't get out.
This can be done, very simple...in the design.

Chest Protectors have gotten a lot of interest or attention focused there, since it has been found that impacts that stop the heart, are common to bike crashes.


 Focus the forces, Be The Force

Post Edited (louemc) : 11/21/2011 8:01:12 PM GMT

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ZX Rider
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   Posted 11/22/2011 7:27 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Hate heavy motorcycles. The ZX-14 is the limit of what I can put up with. It has been lowered which helped tons. The loaded Gold Wing is great on the highway but is pure torture in the city. Tell my passengers, stay inline with my body, don't wiggle or make any sudden moves. I have very short legs which makes the full trim Gold Wing a hand full. The stripped down Goldie is far easier to handle. The dumbest thing ever, two Goldies for a very short guy. Like the sound systems and two way radios. Talking to truckers is pure torture as well. (Breaker, Breaker, know any lot Lizards). Yea, Dude, your sister. $15 bucks.
GAJ said...
Yeah, I'd be "tense" trying to manhandle that beast with no training whatsoever.

To be honest, after 30 years of riding, I think I'd STILL be tense riding that thing!

I like my bikes under 500lbs which is way below what you're dealing with.

Good luck and take it slow; perhaps within a year after you take the course and get some miles under you belt the tension will ease.


Asphalt, the greatest tattoo remover.

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thesoapster
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   Posted 11/24/2011 8:01 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Hope that class goes well one2watch. I agree with Andy. When I took MSF there was a guy there who had inherited one of the huge Harleys from his brother who passed away. He didn't want to sell it. He wanted to ride it in his honor, because it's something his brother absolutely loved to do. He wanted to then hone the skills he gained from the course on something smaller. The Harley is not going anywhere, right? You should take a nice break from it and get a used beater as Andy suggested. You will learn much faster. When riding beyond your limits (which as a beginner are quite low) you're creating a very dangerous situation for yourself - one where I'd worry the least about the wellbeing of the bike getting hurt and more about you.
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Smitty
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   Posted 11/26/2011 5:49 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I agree with Lou  regarding SENSIBLE chest or body protectors, BUT when it becomes STINKING HOT & SO MANY ARE RIDING AROUND IN t-SHIRTS (not to mention shorts & sandals or sneakers) what does the person do without ventilation in such a protective vest?
 
Actually I have a pair of trousers that are ideal in the  spring or autumn as they are warm enough for only my shorts on & completely waterproof.
 
I suffered for 2 years in the HOT weather.  Only this hot weather of August I did purchase a set with VENTILATION in them PLUS removable waterproofing.  Now the latter is throwen on one shelf, for it is the older set that will be used in the colder days, while the new ones, less their waterproofing but the ventilation that are being used for hot days, & yes they are better then jeans.



Remember all the others on the road are crazy & out to kill you.

Post Edited (Smitty) : 11/27/2011 12:56:47 AM GMT

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mac90


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   Posted 12/18/2011 5:54 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
go to a big parking lot an just practice the riding skills you learn at a MSF course. I recommend HD riders edge course. BTW, if you r fighting going wide, you are going to fast for your turn. You need to slow down to turning speed BEFORE you go into a turn on a big bike. And DO NOT touch the front brake while turning.

Post Edited (mac90) : 12/19/2011 12:59:09 AM GMT

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Andy VH
Where is the earth shattering kaboom!?



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   Posted 12/19/2011 7:50 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Going wide in a turn is just as often caused by the rider not having good countersteering and clutch/throttle control as much as speed. I have seen many a rider in my MSF courses, and on the road go wide on turns, especially turns from a stop, at speeds well uder 30 mph. Most often, going wide in a turn is a result of fear of leaning the bike into the turn at slow speeds, and when first pulling out from a stop. Quite oftem also, the rider is looking to the outside of the turn instead of where the bike needs to go.

The technique is to engage the clutch just enough to get the bike moving and then hold it there, look through the turn to the exit, keep the head and eyes turned to the new direction, and roll up the throttle (while still holding the clutch slightly engaged). Then when the front tire is on the intended path, ease out the clutch fully.

On almost any turn, small or big bike, it is good practice to slow before the turn, so you can apply slight throttle before the turn, look through the turn, keep the head turned, and steady throttle through the turn. The throttle application stabilizies the suspension and makes the bike easier to balance through the turn. The bike will want to "stand up and run wide" which is easily balanced by using countersteering input at the grips, press left-go left, press right-go right. Riders who tend to run wide in turns also are not using the countersteering technique moreso than going through too fast.


Training, the best safety and performance "equipment" you can get!
Get MSF trained, check out: http://www.msf-usa.org
 

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RaptorFA
'11 Suzuki GSX1250FA



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   Posted 12/19/2011 9:40 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
louemc said...
I'm finding Armor extends the comfort zone..as insulation from the Sun's heat, and the Cold air as well.
The heat part needs air flow, so flow needs exit....Air can't flow if it can't get out.
This can be done, very simple...in the design.

I wear armor. 2 types actually, depending on the time of year etc. My main under armor is the Icon Field Armor vest. Pretty good chest protector and a fully articulated spine protector. It's so comfy I don't even know I have it on for the most part. I sometimes supplement with the forearm pieces as well.
 
For the long trips or the real hot days I wear the SixSixOne Pressure suit. Great piece, goes on easy, is totally ventilated and causes no issues with mobility on the bike even though it covers the whole upper torso and spine. My pants are pretty good already but I'm thinking about the Field Armor shorts for the hips also. Might take an extra minute or two to get suited up but who cares? Stacking the odds more in your favor is worth an extra minute or two IMO... 


Regards -
 
RaptorFA
Play Hard, Ride Safe

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RaptorFA
'11 Suzuki GSX1250FA



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   Posted 12/19/2011 10:05 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Andy VH said...
On almost any turn, small or big bike, it is good practice to slow before the turn, so you can apply slight throttle before the turn, look through the turn, keep the head turned, and steady throttle through the turn. The throttle application stabilizies the suspension and makes the bike easier to balance through the turn. The bike will want to "stand up and run wide" which is easily balanced by using countersteering input at the grips, press left-go left, press right-go right. Riders who tend to run wide in turns also are not using the countersteering technique moreso than going through too fast.
Great stuff, Andy. Slow, Look, Lean, Roll - I always keep this in my head. They beat this into us pretty good in the MSF course. This and basically pointing my nose at where I want the bike to go and keeping your head level with the road surface - a point that Mr. Hough stresses a lot - are big keys for me at least. I think about it every time before I take my cleansing breath to relax and start the engine. It's kind of a ritual now, but so far it's working pretty well.


Regards -
 
RaptorFA
Play Hard, Ride Safe

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Andy VH
Where is the earth shattering kaboom!?



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   Posted 12/19/2011 1:20 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Yup, it works very well pulling out from a stop as well as sweeping through higher speed turns. But the "look and lean" are both big confidence builders, and confidence destroyers. I have had many a MSF student, both BRC and ERC, turn their head but then not turn the handlebar (in the direction of the turn for turning from a stop) or press in the direction of the turn, and then HOLD that position in motion. Many times I have seen riders make the initial move and then as soon as the bike is moving or picks up a bit of speed, they let the handlebar straighten out.

Key to this, is keep the front wheel pointed where you want to end up, and then get very good at smooth steady throttle application (with partial clutch engagement for pulling out from a stop) to "drive" the bike through the turn or curve. As long as the throttle is applied and power is applied at the rear wheel the bike will WANT to stand up and the rider can then balance against that to lean the bike in. It takes practice, some a lot more than others. On my bikes I can turn the handlebar full lock in either direction and smoothly pull out from a stop both feet up.


Training, the best safety and performance "equipment" you can get!
Get MSF trained, check out: http://www.msf-usa.org
 

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