Motorcycle USA Forums : Join the Revolution
  HomeLog InRegisterCommunity CalendarSearch the ForumHelp
   
Motorcycle Message Board - Motorcycle USA > MotorcycleUSA.com! > Motorcycle Safety > Maximum braking  Forum Quick Jump
 
You cannot post new topics in this forum. You cannot reply to topics in this forum. Printable Version
69 posts in this thread.
Viewing Page :
 1  2  3 
[ | Show Newest Post First ]

Andy VH
Where is the earth shattering kaboom!?



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 4952
 
   Posted Yesterday 2:39 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

Here's another way to look at it. The MSF course quick stop is based on a deceleration rate of 20ft/sec/sec. A good high energy stop that most riders don't at first achieve, but can easily achieve with practice and feel. An experienced rider can easily do better than 20ft/sec/sec, but it is a good reference point.

At 60mph, you're moving at 88ft/sec. A stop at 20ft/s/s decel requires 4.4 seconds of time. To that we add at least .5sec reaction time (if you're really sharp) and the distance works out to .5 x 88ft/sec x 4.4sec = 194 ft!

At only 65mph, its at 95.3ft/sec, so the stop takes 4.77 seconds. So the distance equals 227.3 ft. Five mph faster requires an additional 33.3 feet in length to stop. That's about five bike lengths.

Okay, so 70mph (102.7ft/sec), the stop takes 5.13 seconds. The distance will be 253.5 ft!

So, IF your reaction time is excellant, and you're paying attention, AND your braking skills are at least as good at high speeds as they were during the MSF course at 15 and 20 mph, you now have an idea of how much space you need to stop your bike. That's why it is SO critical not to follow too close.

 

 

Back to Top
 

1Hawk
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Aug 2004
Total Posts : 2013
 
   Posted Yesterday 3:50 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Andy, while I totally agree with your figures I believe there is one fundamental issue missing
and this is road conditions.  We run braking tests on great surfaces to get the most accurate data however, you and I both know the real world offers all kinds of problems that we simply could never incorporate into the test methodology although we try. 
 
I was coming into the station the other day at roughly 45mph and a cager pulled right into my lane as I approached the driveway.  Normally this wouldn't have been a problem had they left a good bit of room however, in this case I had no safety zone and the roadway has a marginal amount of sand and marbles on it.  This was not good so I dove through a hole near the gutter while feather braking both ends.  The tires were squaking and I was ready for a new pair of shorts but hey, any hazard stop you can ride away from must have been a good stop right.......... 
 
And yes, speed increases braking by a ratio of 4:1.
 
Good call....
 
Hawk


In Nature, as in Society, most Creatures are Friendly.  The Secret, is Knowing those that are Not.  Therefore, Knowledge becomes the Key to Understanding.

Back to Top
 

OhioSteve
Registered Member



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 876
 
   Posted 5/28/2005 3:37 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
After reading this thread I consciously tried to decrease my stopping distances. I was pleasantly surprised to discover how much braking power my sedate GS500F really possessed. Someone on this thread said "start easy finish hard" when they described braking. That is really true.

I have also gotten better at deciding whether to brake and downshift, or just brake. That can be a tough decision, and its a decision you don't have long to contemplate.

Now I can stop my bike almost as fast as I can stop my car. Eventually I may be able to stop the bike even faster. Thanks to everyone who contributed to this thread.
Back to Top
 

Smitty
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 22123
 
   Posted 5/28/2005 7:54 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
In time you will find you can stop your bike FASTER then your cage with normal pavement for traction. Imagine the stopping power of a sportbike with front disc brakes almost as large as the front wheel!!!!!!!!! All you need is one finger to lock up the front SO when it comes to stepping up in bikes remember that the stopping power will have increased as well so you need to learn what is a gradual squeeze to one used when needing to stop in an emergencie.

By error one time I thought I was riding my '85 Yamaha FZ-750 when in fact I was riding the '87 Yamaha TZR-250 which is around 75% of an ex-TZ-250 road racer & MASSIVE stopping power. An emergencie stopping bit, I hit the front brake lever like I was riding the FZ-750. Front wheel stopped while rest of the bike & I continued. I went right over the bars & the bike did the same to land on its side.


Remember all the others on the road are crazy & out to kill you.

Post Edited (Smitty) : 5/29/2005 3:01:32 AM GMT

Back to Top
 

DJoplin
05' R1



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 1268
 
   Posted 6/1/2005 2:24 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
After my MSF course CB 125, My R1 and Kates Ninja 250, have I got some brake stories.
The little 125 use all 4 fingers and "CLAMP DOWN" on them. You're not gonna lock up the front wheel. I tried.
On the Ninja 250, requires at least 3 fingers and some force, especially 2-up-downhill.
My R1, I have a bad habit of 1-fingering it. I can just about lock it up w/ 1 finger.
Get used to what you are riding and test the waters before going out on the road. That's the best thing I can say about it. NOthing worse than not being able to stop on one bike and then switching to another to only put yourself over the bars or wash out the front end. LIke Smitty said.


HEY LOOK THE SUNS OUT!!.......oops ya missed it.

Back to Top
 

Smitty
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 22123
 
   Posted 6/1/2005 11:40 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
After that bit of a prang due to forgetting which bike I was riding TWO things have come about. One is all three sportbikes I ride have almost identical stopping power. Second is each bike is a hair different to at the start of that day of riding I am really feeling out how the front brakes work & then combination of both sets.


Remember all the others on the road are crazy & out to kill you.

Back to Top
 

RedDog
Retired SportBike Bum



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 13635
 
   Posted 6/12/2005 6:04 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Hawk: RD, I totally agree with you in that anybody can twist a grip and speed away, the problem occurs when the rider has to stop under conditions that were not anticipated when they decided to crank it up to warp speed.  So, from my point of view, forget speeding away until you can figure out how to properly stop the damn thing. Then, and only then, crank it up and have some fun.
 
Excellent point. On my little MC journey that we just finished, I was happy for the braking capability in the GSX-R coming down from Canada and into MN at 10PM at night when the deer started to run over the highway. We slowed down to 65 and them critters just have to run over the highway. I started zig-zagging to see them better on the sides and that helped prepareness - all in my lane though, Andy. I was a good boy ... :p  And I am happy to say that I use front and rear, and not playing with 75% but as close to 100% as I can get. Some more feet and my squaw would have cut some undamaged meat for supper.


RedDog
Travel Light & Leave Your Fears Behind You!
Normal People Scare me!

Back to Top
 

addysdaddy
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 53
 
   Posted 11/15/2005 4:29 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
This is an excellent post, especially to someone like me who has just graduated the MSF riding course. My new SV-650 arrives today and my first task is to head to the parking lot and get one with my brakes.  I will always remember, "start smooth and end firm."  Thanks again for the post, it was very timely for me.
Andy VH said...
As an instructor of both the old MSF program and the new BRC program, I can say that high effort, maximum braking is a skill very few riders possess or practice. And those that most likely have never practiced it are the ones following other vehicles WAY to close, sometimes not even a car length at 60mph.
 
Over the years, I'd say most students I have trained initially will only apply the front brake to a certain comfort level and figure that's all they have. Usually the rear brake is way over-applied. But think about it, a car has one brake pedal you operate with your foot, with big muscles in that leg, knee and ankle. the brake pedal on a bike can feel somewhat similar, but it only applies about 30% of your braking power, and less as wieght transfer under braking occurs. This misuse of the bike's braking capability means a lot of people hit what they try to avoid or loose control and claim "hadta lay er down!" And get effective at using both brakes, why give up that 30% the rear gives you by not using it. Could mean not punching the Buick!
 
High effort braking is THE most critical skill to master, not just learn. As weight of the rider and bike transfer forward (that's one reason the front fork compresses) under braking, the load on the front tire contact patch increases, which increases that wheel's ability to apply braking effort. One of my fellow instructors explains the correct technique the best, "start smooth and finish FIRM!" Meaning, quickly apply both brakes smoothly, as the front tire load increases, keep increasing your squeeze of the front brake lever, and KEEP increasing it until the bike comes to a stop. Head and eyes up looking well forward helps stabilty. At the same time, smoothly relax brake application on the rear brake to keep from locking it up. Remember, a locked sliding tire will never create as much braking force as a tire that is sliding. (I think you meant to write "as a tire that is rolling."....Cadd.) With practice you'll be surprised how far you can squeeze that front brake lever as you come to a stop. Even on my 94 BMW 1100 I can almost touch the lever to the grip by the end of the stop.
 
But again, this takes time and practice. Its not something you just go out and "hammer." Practice gradual increasing squeeze on the front. If at any time you sense front wheel lock, and you can sense it, IMMEDIATElY release the brake and then re-apply. Once you get familiar with the feel you can easily judge how close to lockup you are getting. The best place to practice this is one an empty, clean, level parking lot. Don't initially practice this on a sloped road. That comes later. Recall too, that the technique has to be adjusted depending on the bike you ride. A low center of gravity, medium power braking Harley is easliy stable during high effort braking. A high center of gravity, very powerful braking Honda CBR900RR can easily get unstable under high effort braking. Each needs a different "touch".
 
Because, I'd guess 80%+, of cycle riders follow other traffic WAY to close (one of my pet peeves, and yes I DO get after myself for the same thing), maximum braking skill is the most critical skill you need to master. I welcome all comments, and challenge me if something I said doesn't make sense. Enjoy the ride!
Back to Top
 

Hawkster
Manic Instructive...



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Sep 2005
Total Posts : 71
 
   Posted 11/22/2005 12:27 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I just ran across an interesting study on this topic.

www.fmq.qc.ca/pdf/amorce-freinage_eng.pdf

Ride safe,

H~


SkillZ Days. Ride well, live long.

Back to Top
 

Smitty
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 22123
 
   Posted 11/22/2005 8:16 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
One well worth reading & studying Hawkster.


Remember all the others on the road are crazy & out to kill you.

Back to Top
 

FunGus
Registered Member



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2004
Total Posts : 1175
 
   Posted 11/23/2005 9:38 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
What about real hard breaking in a curve? I can tell you that more than once, I've been surprised by how much more counter steering is necessary. I know, part of the answer may be not getting into the situation to begin with but on the strret, you never know.


 

Back to Top
 

RedDog
Retired SportBike Bum



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 13635
 
   Posted 11/23/2005 9:43 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Real hard braking in a curve? Just bear in mind that your 100% braking capacity on the stretch has to be shared with the traction needed for your lean angle - thus hard braking in a curve is quite advanced riding. We're touching base with trial braking here where lean and brake is shared keeping at 100% from the beginning of the curve to the apex, more or less.


RedDog
Travel Light & Leave Your Fears Behind You!
Normal People Scare me!

Back to Top
 

Smitty
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 22123
 
   Posted 11/23/2005 3:13 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Must agree with RedDog on this one for starting to apply the anchors when on a bend or twisty means you are into deep trouble & have made a grave error.  Some ways sort of around it, but really they are all pretty chancie no matter how you go about it.  So go into a turn geared down a bit or power down a bit & once at the apex & you can see the light at the end then you can start applying more power if you so wish.


Remember all the others on the road are crazy & out to kill you.

Back to Top
 

RedDog
Retired SportBike Bum



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 13635
 
   Posted 11/23/2005 7:58 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Slow in - fast out.

- Kenny Roberts


RedDog
Travel Light & Leave Your Fears Behind You!
Normal People Scare me!

Back to Top
 

Wixxy
Registered Member



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Sep 2005
Total Posts : 1080
 
   Posted 11/23/2005 9:03 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
If I remember right, one of the magazines did a somewhat scientific study on braking and whether or not there were any other ways to stop quicker than using the front and rear brakes in tandem. They measured stopping distances while using just the front, just the rear, locking up the rear, trying to lock the front, and even doing stoppies. When it was all said and done, nothing matched the use of both front and rear brakes at maximum force without locking them up.
I'm not sure what mag or issue it was, but I believe I was reading the issue on my trip to Iceland in May. If so, I pitched it to conserve space for the flight back. Will still try to find out which one it was. To be honest, I'm not sure if it was a US or UK mag.


'99 Ducati 750 SS (half converted to full)
'95 BMW 318is
'95 Dalmatian
'96 Tabby
'02 International Rescue Truck
 
Instructor for Accident Scene Management, Inc., an organization dedicated to teaching emergency first aid and other safety measures to motorcyclists. Ask me about it!
 

Back to Top
 

RedDog
Retired SportBike Bum



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 13635
 
   Posted 11/23/2005 9:07 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Well spoken. My life has depended on THAT. Always both front and rear, nothing else gives you 100%.


RedDog
Travel Light & Leave Your Fears Behind You!
Normal People Scare me!

Back to Top
 

Top Dawg
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Aug 2004
Total Posts : 1238
 
   Posted 11/24/2005 10:07 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Andy VH said...
Here's another way to look at it. The MSF course quick stop is based on a deceleration rate of 20ft/sec/sec. A good high energy stop that most riders don't at first achieve, but can easily achieve with practice and feel. An experienced rider can easily do better than 20ft/sec/sec, but it is a good reference point.

At 60mph, you're moving at 88ft/sec. A stop at 20ft/s/s decel requires 4.4 seconds of time. To that we add at least .5sec reaction time (if you're really sharp) and the distance works out to .5 x 88ft/sec x 4.4sec = 194 ft!

At only 65mph, its at 95.3ft/sec, so the stop takes 4.77 seconds. So the distance equals 227.3 ft. Five mph faster requires an additional 33.3 feet in length to stop. That's about five bike lengths.

Okay, so 70mph (102.7ft/sec), the stop takes 5.13 seconds. The distance will be 253.5 ft!

So, IF your reaction time is excellant, and you're paying attention, AND your braking skills are at least as good at high speeds as they were during the MSF course at 15 and 20 mph, you now have an idea of how much space you need to stop your bike. That's why it is SO critical not to follow too close.


Andy - you make a good, if inaccurate, point. Your figures wind up being off quite a bit since they don't take the mass of the vehicle into account or velocity-squared so that distances aren't linear as you show them to be. This simply means that you're not going as fast at the end of the first second as you are at the beginning, and at the end of the third second you're going even slower. It also means that a smaller, lighter sport bike will be able to stop quicker than a big, heavy cruiser - doh!

Actual average calculated distances are (assuming a coefficient of friction of 0.8) 60mph=151ft 70mph=204ft

Stopping distance is based on (massXvelocity(squared)Xfriction co-eff) which basically means that if you double your speed, it takes quadruple the distance to stop (on a good, dry surface) - conversly, you will be able to stop in one-fourth the distance if you cut your speed in half...handy to know when driving in inclement weather or on gravel or sand.

However, having said all that and even with my more accurate calculations, I would rather err on the high side as you did than crash into the back of another vehicle!

freaked freaked freaked


'03 VN1600 Classic "Shagger"
IBA #21119
SCCMal#10028
VROC #12939
S.O.M.A.

Back to Top
 

RedDog
Retired SportBike Bum



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 13635
 
   Posted 11/24/2005 10:39 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Me think you guys can play with your equations. Here are some real braking distances from a racer to a newbie on an FJ1200. Also different bikes are way different too. The little Kawa 636 did brake from 100 mph - 0 in 332 feet. If you use over 200 feet braking from just 60 mph, you need to practice braking. In fact practice braking is real smart.

Here's the link too: http://www.ibmwr.org/prodreview/abstests.html

Dry Pavement Braking over Sewer Cover *
(All measurements recorded with Yamaha FJ1200) **

Racer non-ABS 158 ft
w/ ABS 163 ft
Full ABS Control 166 ft

Mileman non-ABS 181 ft
w/ ABS 172 ft
Full ABS Control 167 ft

Road Rider non-ABS 160 ft
w/ ABS 165 ft
Full ABS Control 162 ft

Tourer non-ABS 186 ft
w/ ABS 167 ft
Full ABS Control 166 ft

Mechanic non-ABS 199 ft
w/ ABS 171 ft
Full ABS Control 169 ft

Newguy non-ABS 180ft
w/ ABS 168 ft
Full ABS Control 166 ft

NOTE: The surface used for this test varied slightly from that used in Figure #2 to compare ultimate stopping distances. Stopping distances between Figure #2 and Figure #3 are not comparative.

* All braking distances expressed in feet from 60 mph
** Both the ABS BMW and ABS Honda ST ran using this same test and achieved similar results.


RedDog
Travel Light & Leave Your Fears Behind You!
Normal People Scare me!

Back to Top
 

YellowDuck
Registered Member



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 4130
 
   Posted 11/24/2005 3:14 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I understand the "twice the speed, four times the distance" argument, and sometimes use it myself. But if you want to be accurate, keep in mind that air resistance also increases exponentially with velocity (yes, I am being coy on that, because I can't remember if it is as the square or the cube), which means that when you are going really fast you get a lot of braking for free just by getting off the throttle.

So, if you COULD do maximum effort braking from a high speed, it wouldn't be quite as bad as twice-the-speed-four-times-the-distance. But of course on the other hand it takes a serious pair to brake to the point of lockup from 100 mph+, so maybe it all balances out in the end!


I can't complain...but sometimes I still do.
Life's been good to me so far.
 

Back to Top
 

Smitty
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 22123
 
   Posted 11/24/2005 8:15 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

In the old days of road racing with skelton bikes & drum brakes that would fit in with your thinking YD for when we came to the bends or zigging around the hay bales we would sit as bolt up as we could & even spread our legs to try & help the bike slow down. I remember Percy's brain wave of yanking down the zipper, by a cord, to upon up his jacket to create more resistance only he cold not get the zipper up again. While Currly suggest we make up a small pairshoot(sp?) for his next crazy attempt at slowing down his Vincent HRD.  LOL

Mind you I was putting on big scoups to try & help cool the single cam drum brakes down to even an outlet at the back though many variations of different scoups at the front.  Though we felt the double cam front brakes on the road racers were simply out of this world in stopping power. Some even thougt the massive scoups I was installing would pull the bike over to the side.  My how little we knew then.


Remember all the others on the road are crazy & out to kill you.

Back to Top
 

GeoffG
Instant Classic



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Jun 2003
Total Posts : 10791
 
   Posted 11/24/2005 10:40 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Wixxy said...
If I remember right, one of the magazines did a somewhat scientific study on braking and whether or not there were any other ways to stop quicker than using the front and rear brakes in tandem...To be honest, I'm not sure if it was a US or UK mag.

There was a pretty good article on this subject in Cycle Canada sometime during the last year or two...they found the absolute shortest braking distances were obtained by applying the rear brake an instant before the front, then progressively bearing down on the brake levers to keep both brakes on the verge of lockup (actually, exactly what you'd expect). My feeling is, though, that braking technique is going to depend partially on your bike--if you're riding a cruiser or big tourer, or any bike 2-up, your rear brake is going to be more important to you since the bike will have a more rearward weight bias. Riding solo on a modern sportbike, though, I feel the rear brake can not only be safely dispensed with, in fact it could be less safe to use for most riders of average skill because the massive forward weight transfer made possible by modern front brakes, coupled with typical sportbike chassis design, makes it incredibly easy to lock the rear brake under heavy braking (note how weak most modern sportbike rear brakes are these days!).
Back to Top
 

FunGus
Registered Member



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2004
Total Posts : 1175
 
   Posted 11/28/2005 1:46 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Regarding the curves.... I agree with you guys. What you are saying is pretty well known, especially in regards to sport riding. I guess I have a little "bad" habit: when I'm around town, I sometimes like to take the on/off ramps a little faster than necessary - just to get a little lean going. Nothing too extreme. I know that in this scenario, I am not exceeding the limitations of the tires. I'm just not going fast or "tight" enough. In this instance, if I apply the front brake (for whatever reason), the bike wants to stand up. For me, experiencing this is good because in my world, I may find myself in this exact position. I could be exiting the Lincoln Tunnel, riding on its huge curving exit ramp and suddenly be faced with a vehicle that is wrecklessly changing lanes. It's not ideal. But was is?


 

Back to Top
 

Smitty
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 22123
 
   Posted 11/28/2005 4:32 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

That was a good article in Cycle Canada a while back & I probably still have it around.  If I remember correctly they also talked about covering the brakes & clutch lever stating the fractions of a second saved could be the difference between stopping safetly some inches from the cage or actually the hit.

That cought my attention for I am one that covers said levers & this comes through Obseved Trials comp & when we were dealing with 2-strokes in road racing.  The road racer right in front of you & one we were trying to slip-stream, being far closer then now due to skelton bikes, could mean pure 'ell if his engine started to lock up with engine seizing AND the same to those that road raced the 2-stokes as a quick grab of the clutch might only mean a hone job on the cast iron liners & set of rings rather then a welded piston or worse yet big-end shot. So many photos showed both only inches apart from you but BOTH riders with hands out & covering the levers.


Remember all the others on the road are crazy & out to kill you.

Back to Top
 

addysdaddy
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 53
 
   Posted 12/7/2005 9:54 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Been practicing my braking and have encountered a problem - as I grab a handful of front brake, I will on ocassion roll on the throttle. What can you suggest to help avoid this from occuring?
Back to Top
 

GeoffG
Instant Classic



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Jun 2003
Total Posts : 10791
 
   Posted 12/7/2005 10:10 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
addysdaddy said...
as I grab a handful of front brake, I will on ocassion roll on the throttle.

Make sure your brake levers are mounted in the right place. You can rotate the brake lever pivot up or down on the handlebar--the levers should be where they allow a straight line from your forearms to your fingers, as your finger rest on the levers.

You can practice rolling the throttle off more as you grab the brake.

But mostly, just make sure you always pull in the clutch.
Back to Top
 
You cannot post new topics in this forum. You cannot reply to topics in this forum. Printable Version
69 posts in this thread.
Viewing Page :
 1  2  3 
 
Forum Information
Currently it is Thursday, May 25, 2017 10:32 PM (GMT -7)
There are a total of 500,924 posts in 39,661 threads.
In the last 3 days there were 0 new threads and 0 reply posts. View Active Threads
Who's Online
This forum has 21237 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, whhhhhaaaat.
1 Guest(s), 0 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details