Motorcycle USA Forums : Join the Revolution
  HomeLog InRegisterCommunity CalendarSearch the ForumHelp
   
Motorcycle Message Board - Motorcycle USA > MotorcycleUSA.com! > Motorcycle Safety > THE CRITICAL SKILLS YOU HAVE TO MASTER  Forum Quick Jump
 
You cannot post new topics in this forum. You cannot reply to topics in this forum. Printable Version
46 posts in this thread.
Viewing Page :
 1  2 
[ | Show Newest Post First ]

Andy VH
Where is the earth shattering kaboom!?



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 4952
 
   Posted 2/22/2006 9:31 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Motorcycling is great once you learn it. But it can be frightening, dangerous if you don't know it. I'd say maybe, 5% of the public have the intuitive skills that allow them to ride well from day one. that leaves 95% of us who don't know squat about motorcycles, riding, surviving unless we learn it. That's why I have always felt there are what I call CRITICAL skills all riders must master to survive. So what are they?
1) Cornering: this covers everything from sightlines, apex choice, lane position, traction control, visual control, counter-steering and more. Ever hear a rider say "the bike just wouldn't turn?". Over 40% of cycle accidents are single bike accidents running off the road so this is definitely a critical skill.
2) Braking: this includes bike stability, stopping in a curve, traction control (again) visual control (again), braking setup before a curve, HIGH EFFORT BRAKING, proper use of one or both brakes depending on the circumstance and knowing when to use which technique, and more. Many of us have heard "had to lay er' down" which is usually a knee-jerk reaction to a panic/pucker factor mistake. That makes it a critical skill.
3) Bike stability: this involves traction control (AGAIN), balance, understanding of motorcycle dynamics and physics (what experienced riders call "feel"). Because it is a key element of "keeping the rubber side down" it is a critical skill.
5) Swerving: Swerving and the ability to QUICKLY and ACCURATELY move a motorcycle exactly where you want it is a skill that develops with training and seat time. It involves bike stability (always), traction control (again with the TC!), visual control (more yet!?), ACTIVE counter-steering and knowing how the bike reacts. A wrong move here could actually drive you right into the hazard!! Sounds like a critical skill to me.
4) Vision: Huh? Vision? We all got it, haven't seen too many blind riders. This is a critical skill? It is because ACTIVE, AGGRESSIVE VISUAL CONTROL can impact your riding almost more than any other factor. ALL of the pro riders have phenomenal visual capabilities, we make do with ours but you have to learn how to use it right.
5) Traction control: Anyone notice I mentioned traction control a few times? Well, throttle and clutch control here are critical to maintain bike stability. We've all seen a rider dump/pop the clutch, and crank in way to much throttle and seen the ugly results. Almost all motorcycles have FAR more power per pound of weight than most cars, unless you drive a Ferrari F40. Gotta learn how to manage it.
6) Attitude: This is a big one, because it detemines how we approach riding, how we understand our skills, abilities and especially our limitations. It's what keeps our ego in check while riding. To the experienced riders this is what's going on between the ears that tells us when we should or should NOT ride. It makes us realize who is most responsible for what happens to us (ourselves in other words). It affects our JUDGEMENT, which can defintiely have a critical impact on our riding.
7) Street/survival skills: HUGE! 50%+ of all accidents are the car turning left in front of us. Trained skills here help us avoid this altogether, which is far better than reacting to it. No one just "knows" this, but develops it or learns it from those of us who know. This is the experienced rider's intuition, that triggers something in the brain to be ready, change lanes, change speed, signal, downshift, brake, whatever to  avoid a threatening situation. A mistake in a car may injure you. A mistake on a bike is MUCH more likely to kill you. This is one of the top level critical skills.
 
Every one of these are not intuitive to riding, and must be learned, practiced and mastered to survive.
I welcome any comments or additions to further develop this list. To all the new riders out there, you think you honestly know all this already and are ready to buy a GSXR or an FLHT as your first bike? Those who think they are "experienced riders", do you have all of these mastered? If not, get trained. Open up your mind, relax your ego, admit you have a lot to learn. We all do.
 
 


Training, the best safety and performance "equipment" you can get!
Get MSF trained, check out: http://www.msf-usa.org

Post Edited (Andy VH) : 3/24/2007 5:21:34 PM GMT

Back to Top
 

RedDog
Retired SportBike Bum



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 13635
 
   Posted 2/22/2006 9:40 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
"Those who think they are "experienced riders", do you have all of these mastered?"

Andy, after 40 years of riding, and closing in towards 1/2 million miles, I can honestly say: "I am working on it!" IF I had said "Yes I do!" I would have married some attitude issues and that's not good. You can always improve.


RedDog
Travel Light & Leave Your Fears Behind You!
Normal People Scare me!

Back to Top
 

Go Bucks
'03 CBR600 F4i



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 185
 
   Posted 2/22/2006 11:21 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Andy - Could you explain 1.) a little better for us noobs. Define apex, how to choose the correct apex, and expand on sightlines. thanks.
Back to Top
 

Andy VH
Where is the earth shattering kaboom!?



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 4952
 
   Posted 2/22/2006 11:46 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Wow, there is a LOT to explain on that subject. Far too much and somewhat difficult to explain without visuals. In essence, most turns should be taken with an outside-inside-outside lane position. Meaning, divide your lane on a two lane highway into three parallel paths, outside closest to the centerline, inside closest to the shoulder. So when you enter a turn, generally, you position the bike in the left third (outside) at the beginning of the turn, at the point where in the turn you are closest to the shoulder (inside) you are passing the apex, as you finish the turn you come out at the outside position again. What you have done is make the turn a bigger radius/easier than if you just stayed in one lane position through the turn. But, it is not the same for every turn, and the apex "moves" in that it occurs where YOU decide it is.

But a poorly chosen apex can have bad results if you don't apply it properly. For inexperienced riders this means some run wide into the oncoming lane, some repsond "the bike wouldn't make the curve", some run off the inside of the turn. Check out the books "Proficient Motorcycling" or "Motorcycling Excellance" for some of the best details on apex and lane position for real world riding. This is a prime example why training is necessary. Enjoy the ride!
Back to Top
 

Andy VH
Where is the earth shattering kaboom!?



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 4952
 
   Posted 2/22/2006 11:53 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
"Sightlines" are your visual lines of sight through turns. It helps direct your path of travel through a turn. It helps you determine an appropriate speed through turns. It helps you maintain the bikes stability through a turn. It helps you to see problems, hazards and obstacles well before you get to them, gives you a path to choose. Most riders look down right in front of the bike, especially in turns, when their "sightline" should be all the way through the turn to the exit.
Back to Top
 

louemc
Registered Member



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 17483
 
   Posted 2/22/2006 1:40 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Most excellent Thread you have going Andy VH. Well worded and focused on the on going issues that unfold on the road. And I liked Go Bucks question as well, because the issue of "seeing" is different for a biker than a cager. Picking a line, for a bike only having the two wheels to depend on, is a little more critical than something that doesn't fall over. Would it be fair to inject the Critical Skills are so more readily found in the dirt, where traction, traction interaction with turning, picking a line because there isn't a whole traffic lane in front of you (line choice commonly comes down to prefered inches, horrid option outside of that) braking on dirt, balancing at slow speeds/high complications. Major involvement with the controls of the bike to carry things off? On one hand I didn't want to risk messing up what you have going here, on the other hand, I wanted to add to it. Oh, maybe not a classified as critical skill, but something I'll call a truism........ the critical skills are way more critical than gets recognized, because when they are ingrained into the mind, something else happens, and that is confidence that has the learned background to support the confidence. That is critical because, when you have to do the right thing (of course you always have to do the right thing, but I mean with a higher demand on getting through a situation) Confidence translates to relaxed state of being. I find that any concern, translates to a spectum of stiffness and loss of precision in the moves. That can be anything from just not with the program, to actually freeze in fear. Back the event up to looking at something that has to be done at perfect or precise sequence, and, concern/fear, messing that up, guarantees the failure that was feared, as opposed to seeing the event unfold under the controled focus and correct moves. (and of course correct has to be known from experience, it's sure not going to be found out after the event starts). Does this fit in with what you want in this thread? If not, a mod should be able to delete it.

Post Edited (louemc) : 2/22/2006 9:10:03 PM GMT

Back to Top
 

Shea
Registered Member



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Feb 2006
Total Posts : 325
 
   Posted 2/22/2006 1:57 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Yes, def a good thread. I knew how to take turns, I just didnt know the technical info about it. It's def something that although I know "how" it's done, I still need lots of practice. I found myself trying to practice it today with no traffic coming and I was on the yellow line and that's a no-no, since the lines can get slick and a car crossing over that line by a few inches would have clipped me.
Back to Top
 

louemc
Registered Member



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 17483
 
   Posted 2/22/2006 2:21 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Don't know which way the turn was going, but, if it is going to your left, another thing that takes huge attention, is, don't even have your wheels even remotely near that center line, because your head is (with the bikes lean) over the center line, and the quickness of the discovery of the closing speed of two objects (one being your head, the other being the car, and technically both of you are in your own lane, as far as the wheels are concerned), being in the same place at the same time is a dead biker. I'll assume that wasn't happening, and you are very right, any painted thing, whether it's a road line, or those big wide turn arrows, or there is quite a list of things (steel plates on road work, steel rails at RR crossings, cattle guards, etc.) are all just treated like ice.
Back to Top
 

Andy VH
Where is the earth shattering kaboom!?



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 4952
 
   Posted 2/22/2006 10:48 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Excellant points Louemc. Oh yeah, dirt riding REALLY exemplifies all the aspects of riding because to effectively ride on the dirt you have to CONSTANTLY manage what traction and balance you can find. Dirt riding is on the edge of traction most of the time, that's what makes it so fun too. I liked your comment "Confidence translates to relaxed state of being".
This has to do with muscle and action memory. There are parts of our nervous system and brain, that when trained for an event just take over on auto-pilot of a sort. We get to see it in slow motion and handle it. How else can you explain a pro-baseball batter that can see the rotation of the ball and the stitching when the ball is pitched at him at 100 mph?

Head over the center line on a left hand turn (right hand in England, Japan, New Zealand, who knows) is a real danger on twisty roads. Especially if a Winnebago is coming the other way riding the center line, with those extended mirrors sticking out.
Back to Top
 

DragonRider
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 60
 
   Posted 4/7/2006 10:15 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Great posting!

I usually post in the Newbie forum, but I would like to comment on this part of Andy VH's post:


" 6) Attitude: This is a big one, because it detemines how we approach riding, how we understand our skills, abilities and limitations. It's what keeps our ego in check while riding. To the experinced riders this is what's going on between the ears that tells us when we should or should NOT ride. It makes us realize who is most responsible for what happens to us (ourselves in other words). It affects our JUDGEMENT, which can defintiely have a critical impact on our riding."


This is key to why I'm still willing to ride despite known risks. I use all of the "tools" available to me to make me a safer and more aware rider.

This is why my signature announces "It's a good day to ride!". It has nothing to do with the weather, but is rather my personal mantra. Can I honestly say "It's a good day to ride?" before I leave on a ride? If not, if everything does not feel right, I put the bike away. I've only cancelled my riding plans twice this way, but it really helps me to "tune-in".

Thx for all of the great info!

DR
771 miles


It's a good day to ride!
2005 Honda Rebel 250

Back to Top
 

Andy VH
Where is the earth shattering kaboom!?



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 4952
 
   Posted 4/8/2006 12:18 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
You're welcome Dragon Rider. Good to see this post is still getting hits and reactions. You are exactly right about attitude and mental riding. If your brain isn't in the game, don't ride. There are days for me too when I know I am not 100% and I don't ride. Trust your intuition, it tells you a lot of what could happen to you.
Back to Top
 

Wilkie
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Dec 2004
Total Posts : 382
 
   Posted 4/8/2006 6:03 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I agree, there are some days when, mentally, it's just wisest to leave the bike parked, but DataDan suggests in the Spring Training thread that you can take those bad days when you're out on the road and things just don't feel right and turn the trip into a "skills ride." Forget about pleasure for the day and just work on drills to improve yourself. Strikes me as a real good idea. Is there ever a better time - when things just aren't clicking - to pay even closer attention to picking the right line, practicing quicks stops or any of the other skills that will make us better, safer riders?


 
2004 Triumph Sprint ST: Dec. 2005-present
1999 Triumph Legend: Oct. 2004-Dec. 2005 
 

Back to Top
 

bmwr100r
Airhead



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 1455
 
   Posted 4/8/2006 9:54 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
That is a great idea. I have had those days also where "it don't feel right" and have just called it a day. But next time that happens I will make good use of my time and work on my limited skills. In a VERY big empty paved lot of course.


 A wise man's heart directs him toward the right ,but the foolish man's heart directs him toward the left. Ecclesiastes 10:2

Back to Top
 

Smitty
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 22123
 
   Posted 4/8/2006 6:06 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

My compliments Andy.  Well thought out & written.  Also liked Lou's bit of not having your head & such on the wrong side of the center yellow line.  I have to watch that for some of our twisties are pretty darn narrow.  In fact when I hit the few four lane roads even if I am riding well above the max speed limit I pick the slow lane to the right be there traffic or no traffic.


Remember all the others on the road are crazy & out to kill you.

Back to Top
 

RedDog
Retired SportBike Bum



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 13635
 
   Posted 4/8/2006 7:53 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Yeah, with all them soccer moms on cell phones and their brothers, our normal race line in blind corners are disturbed to a more cautious one. Trust no one.


RedDog
Travel Light & Leave Your Fears Behind You!
Normal People Scare me!

Back to Top
 

Ratslash7
Registered Member



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 88
 
   Posted 4/8/2006 8:32 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Thanks Andy. It's nice to see this stuff written down. Kinda' helps it gell in my head. I've been riding for over 30 years and I definitely think there are things I need to work on. I doubt any of us feel we have mastered every critical skill. I like to paraphrase a line from my 12 step program:

I seek motorcycling skills progress - not motorcycling skills perfection

I just want to keep getting better. Sometimes I feel that I'm not improving and that's when I take more of my riding time doing drills.

When my head's not in it I spend my motorcycling time doing maintanance. Sometimes it's almost as gratifying bleeding brakes and checking other fluids, perhaps replacing fork oil or adjusting valves. I have 2 bikes over 20 years old theres always something to be done.


Dave


BMWr100/7 1980 (Rat-Cafe)

BMW R100RT 1984 (The Traveler)



Got Gummikuh?

Back to Top
 

Andy VH
Where is the earth shattering kaboom!?



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 4952
 
   Posted 4/9/2006 9:47 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Thank you everyone! I really appreciate the additional input. These responses make me feel about my rants against "I learned to ride a bike in a day", or a recent one, "I don't believe training is necessary when a rider could learn all they'll need to know in a couple of hours with an experienced rider."

The laws of natural selection still apply to motorcycling!
Back to Top
 

Sxty8goats
he's just this guy.. you know?



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Jun 2006
Total Posts : 140
 
   Posted 6/15/2006 8:20 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I guess this is as good a place as any for my first post.

Great thread. I just finished the Rider's Edge course put on by Harley. It was a great course that focused on many of the points you brought up. I have just enough confidence to ride on lightly traficked streets. More importantly, I have knowlage of how the bike should be ridden and how much I need to learn. Breaking before a corner. Sounds simple and logical but as a driver of a car, we break hard into the corner, not before.. So much to learn, so many habbits to break/ establish. I still pratice some of the exercises that they ran us through and came here to find more pointers. Thanks for your tips.
Back to Top
 

Andy VH
Where is the earth shattering kaboom!?



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 4952
 
   Posted 7/3/2006 8:16 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Keep the respones coming folks. I welcome all comments and additions!
Back to Top
 

KF
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 437
 
   Posted 7/8/2006 7:19 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Louemc wrote," Confidence translates to relaxed state of being". This statement rings a bell. Daily commuters who ride in rush hour big city traffic know how fast situations change and hazards arise. Andy went on to explain that it's the brain on autopilot. This might sound nuts, but here goes. When I ride back and forth to work in NYC rush hour traffic, if things start to really heat up, I enjoy the ride more. I think it's because I get personal satisfaction knowing that I can remain calm and handle the situation without getting too rattled. . In David L. Hough's book, "Proficient Motorcycling", on page 31 he writes, "Novices start out with the physical skills of mastering the clutch, throttle, brakes and balance. Veterans understand that motorcycling is really more of a mental process of scrutinizing the situation, evaluating the hazards, and deciding what to do with the motorcycle". I think about this often and it emphasizes what the Basic Rider Course teaches, Search, Evaluate and Execute. I live by this, and I believe that the harder you "SEE", the better chance you have riding another time.


Ride Slow,anticipate hazards!

Back to Top
 

scotty b
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 1
 
   Posted 8/4/2006 4:57 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

just a quick question, i have a 2002 yahmaha R1 and the other day i was riding along and it felt as if my front tire was low, i checked it and it was fine but the handlling was loose as if the tire was flat,at faster speeds like 60 or so in a straight line its not to bad almost no noticing of it. but when ou take a off ramp at about 30 with a tight cure the front tire starts to bounce a little so i started to think maybe my front shocks were loose but i am not sure how to check them and i dont want to mess something up even worse. also i looked at the part where the absorbers are and on one side it is shinny and the other it is dull.  any suggestions on what might be wrong or what i might be able to do.

thanks

scotty b

Back to Top
 

Candy750
06 Shadow Aero



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 1217
 
   Posted 8/15/2006 9:06 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I think I ride the turns the way you describe - with the outside, inside, outside - yes, sort of flattening them a bit. Criticism I get:   1) I'm not staying in "formation", 2) Not leaning like I should, 3) you're not supposed to ride like that.

I am MFS taught.

PS - local HOG group rides REQUIRE you stay in formation in curves, suggesting If you cannot, maybe not the group to ride with. Have a few HD friends who invite, I always turn down, know I can't do...


Dark Candy Aero 750
 
 
Well behaved women rarely make history.
 
 

Post Edited (Candy750) : 8/16/2006 1:53:37 PM GMT

Back to Top
 

Demon Bane
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 135
 
   Posted 8/15/2006 12:46 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Anyone who insists on riding in formation through turns is just stupid IMHO. In the curves you want to have as much room to work with as possible, so you should always spread out and ride "single-file" (not strictly, but just with no one next to you) through the curves. Once you're back in the straightaways it's fine to go back to formation.
Back to Top
 

Candy750
06 Shadow Aero



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 1217
 
   Posted 8/16/2006 6:53 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I can't access the local chapter's site now (from work). I had read it a while back - was going to post their rules so you could see. Looked at other HOG sites, and they do not put this in. The one I am referring to was very specific. Maybe you cna go look at it see www.spitzie's.com and click on the group rides link. Maybe I am reading it wrong?


Dark Candy Aero 750
 
 
Well behaved women rarely make history.
 
 

Back to Top
 

DataDan
Rodent Of Unusual Size



Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Sep 2003
Total Posts : 1054
 
   Posted 8/16/2006 8:39 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

Candy750 wrote:

...local HOG group rides REQUIRE you stay in formation in curves...

I can't access the local chapter's site now (from work). I had read it a while back - was going to post their rules so you could see. Looked at other HOG sites, and they do not put this in.

I was skeptical, so I checked it out. You're right. The group riding link at the Spitzies HOG page actually takes you to the group ride rules for an Oregon HOG chapter. Those rules do indeed say:

Taking turns in a group requires that you be skilled enough to feel comfortable negotiating and carving turns at the posted speed limit or above. We ride through the turn staggered in a group, but we don't violate the space to the side of the bike in front of us, in the event they need to do an emergency maneuver.

Not good practice, IMHO. You can do it at parade speed, but "at the posted speed limit or above" a rider should be able to use to use his full lane.


A superior rider uses superior judgment to avoid problems that would demand his superior skill.

Back to Top
 
You cannot post new topics in this forum. You cannot reply to topics in this forum. Printable Version
46 posts in this thread.
Viewing Page :
 1  2 
 
Forum Information
Currently it is Thursday, July 27, 2017 5:53 PM (GMT -7)
There are a total of 500,924 posts in 39,661 threads.
In the last 3 days there were 0 new threads and 0 reply posts. View Active Threads
Who's Online
This forum has 21237 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, whhhhhaaaat.
1 Guest(s), 0 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details