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Mac_Muz
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   Posted 3/1/2007 10:31 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
RedDog said...
The Worst thing to hit in a corner is yourself ...
 
For example just a few miles over your own comfort zone, brings you into Panic Management. In that zone, riders/bikers will do either the right thing, the wrong thing or nothing, which is equal to the wrong thing.
 
Panic hits you, you feel it all over. Intense heat, heartpumping negative adrenaline rush. This is going to hurt!
At this point, can you think beyond and do something fast before it's too late?
 
It can come as easy as a normal pace ride on familiar ride and you miss your count before this 25mph corner. You think you are in 3rd but changing down for the curve, you all of a sudden find yourself sliding into the curve with blocked rear wheel. You are in 1st hits you. That easy. What do you do when this hits you, caused by yourself?
 
Of course, some lucky ones has slipper clutch but we can still come nonchalantly into a corner way to fast - same feeling.
 
I read the article, Lou, about that Deceptive Factor. It's true, you get into this rhytm and the pace deceptively gets faster. SO true.
 


So easy, only a cave man can do it.
Ossipee New Hampster "Eat Seeds or Die"
 
 

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notrequired
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   Posted 6/22/2008 1:04 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
This when you think, oh man I should have bought that full face helmut, I hope I have a chin and jaw in about 3 seconds.

Yes, It happens that fast but it feels like slow motion at the time.

So laugh as you pass me without your helmut and hope you are lucky.
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RedDog
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   Posted 6/30/2009 8:19 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
We talked about Panic Management and that's linked to ride within your limits. But how do you get a better rider if you from day one or so just to that?

In order to get a better and more confident rider when you get into this panic zone, you have to explore. I say take a dirt bike and play in an open field. Make your track and play with rear wheel slipping, sliding - and do something. Let the front slide and go figure what to do. Or when they both slide. Do something. Front wheel slide, try gasing it. Rear wheel slide, try easing it.

There's reasons this happens and there are solutions. One of the better way to really be able to handle your own panic management is mentioned and then, get on the track. There, you can explore yourself and your abilities, and become a better rider. Back on the street, you will be going slower, safer and you at least have some tools to handle your Panic Management.

My little point is, you may find yourself in the scary zone. Then you better have your arsenal of tools ready.


RedDog
Think Ahead! Travel Light & Leave Your Fears Behind You!
Normal People Scare me! Travel Light and Leave Your Fears Behind You!

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Andy VH
Where is the earth shattering kaboom!?



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   Posted 8/13/2009 11:55 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
The "trick" to get beyond the panic reaction zone, is to step into just enough to learn something from it. Practice that, break it down, master it, then step in a little deeper and repeat.

When I first touched down a boot edge, I thought "cool" and analyzed how I was able to do that, and built on it. Same for when I touched down some harder parts, like sidestands and centerstands. Same for the first time I had a rear tire break loose just a bit on dry pavement cornering.

Like Red says, once you step into that zone, you have to be ready or your natural instinct/defense mechanisms will kick in and over power you and the bike.


Training, the best safety and performance "equipment" you can get!
Get MSF trained, check out: http://www.msf-usa.org

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louemc
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   Posted 8/13/2009 1:55 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
RedDog said...
We talked about Panic Management and that's linked to ride within your limits. But how do you get a better rider if you from day one or so just to that?

In order to get a better and more confident rider when you get into this panic zone, you have to explore. I say take a dirt bike and play in an open field. Make your track and play with rear wheel slipping, sliding - and do something. Let the front slide and go figure what to do. Or when they both slide. Do something. Front wheel slide, try gasing it. Rear wheel slide, try easing it.

There's reasons this happens and there are solutions. One of the better way to really be able to handle your own panic management is mentioned and then, get on the track. There, you can explore yourself and your abilities, and become a better rider. Back on the street, you will be going slower, safer and you at least have some tools to handle your Panic Management.

My little point is, you may find yourself in the scary zone. Then you better have your arsenal of tools ready.

 
Very well said... I've tried to put myself in the frame of mind, of the people talking about what they find fearsome.
 
I know I've felt fear, decades ago, riding dirt.  Look over an edge, at a down hill "path" you have to go down.  Your beyond the turning back possibility, you have to go on, and there is only one "on" to take.  Down a long steep decent, that you just know will result in out of control, ever increasing speed, Your about to die.
 
After a rather huge number of "I'm gonna die" events, (that didn't result in death)  it's an incentive to stop letting your imagination scare you.  As you experience a whole lotta fear instilled body tightening, slower reactions, and jerky movements, it becomes a real incentive, when you need to do something right (because wrong is a crash), then getting control of your mind, gets easier.
 
Somewhere along the line, paying attention comes about.  There is no excuse for Brain Farts, mis-judgements, (the corner was such a surprise, even though I was looking at it well in advance) or any of the long list of things that get talked about, as something to "panic" about.
 
All you have to do is, do more than you have done, before  (that can become an addiction in its self).  But after a while, if you work on it, everything is Old Hat, nothing to get Hung About (words from a Beetles song, Strawberry Fields forever).


 Focus the forces, Be The Force

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Andy VH
Where is the earth shattering kaboom!?



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   Posted 8/14/2009 12:34 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
The word "fear" can be considered an acronym, standing for:
False
Expectations
Appearing
Real

But fear can be a good thing relative to attitude and judgement about riding. It gives us the basis from which to determine our risk comfort range, and how to approach a difficult condition.


Training, the best safety and performance "equipment" you can get!
Get MSF trained, check out: http://www.msf-usa.org

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excitebiker
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   Posted 6/30/2011 11:43 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I've got a few friends who have been in some fairly bad situations. Funnily enough, they said that's trained them for the future. I haven't been in that sticky (or bloody) of a situation yet, and I'm super thankful. I hope all of my fellow riders the same.
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RedDog
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   Posted 6/30/2011 12:46 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
excitebiker said...
I've got a few friends who have been in some fairly bad situations. Funnily enough, they said that's trained them for the future. I haven't been in that sticky (or bloody) of a situation yet, and I'm super thankful. I hope all of my fellow riders the same.


Your friend is SO correct!

It's all about learning:

1. The soft way - as from a book, magazine, safe environment read parking lot, low speed --> MSF or something similar among some old dogs. Old dogs are good for teaching new trick, young pups follows, better than their 2-legged best friends

2. The scary way - "Darn! THAT was close!" Go back and check what happen? Was it pure luck that saved your life - or - did you overcome and improvise --> QUICK

3. The Pain Way - sorry, but this has the quickest learning curve of them all. A crash, some broken legs, analyzing the situation amd figure out what you could have done. If you don't figure it out, try again. Go where it happened, be a CSI'er. Talk to some old dogs if you don't get it. My front wheel started sliding ... what did you do and what could you have done.

Some riders says, I am OK, I know how to handle a bike, a situation. The wise riders says: I want to learn more, there is always something to learn riding a bike and it's environment.


RedDog
Think Ahead! Travel Light & Leave Your Fears Behind You!
Normal People Scare me! Travel Light and Leave Your Fears Behind You!

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