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Casper
The teddy bear of doom,,,



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   Posted 12/3/2008 7:57 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I did some PM'ing with a fast developing newbie rider recently and he/she mentioned that sometimes they were having to make uncomfortable corrections after entering curves.  I typed up a tip and I thought it was pretty decent, so here we go.
 
Critique as you will:
 
 
 
About correcting yourself - that's perfectly normal and is usually either an issue of attention or an issue of judgment.  You know how to control the motorcycle, how to put it where you want it at the speed you want to be going - so if you're sometimes getting caught going into a corner too hot or maybe being out of position then either you weren't paying attention and just boo-booed, or you made an incorrect judgment on where you want to be or how fast/slow you need to be going.
 
If it's the attention issue, well, welcome to the club.  We all struggle to keep the attention level up and not let the mind wander off.  Now that you've developed some muscle memory it's gotten easier to ride the bike.  It's almost second nature now isn't it?  And now it's harder to maintain focus.  The biggest thing I do to help me keep the focus is to think in terms of being graceful.  When I ride demos at BRC, or ride the twisties, or just head to the store, I try to look at all times like a dancer with wheels on my feet.  Perfect control, perfect poise, no false moves, no clumsiness or mistakes.  Trying to do that helps me to keep my riding sharp.
 
If it's the judgment issue, well that's the big thing that comes with time and experience.  We want to always enter every situation more slowly and cautiously than we think we really need to be - remembering that we can always roll on throttle later.  As time goes by and your skills get sharper you will learn from your mistakes and sometimes your idea of "how fast is too fast" will be faster than before - and in some cases it will be slower!
 
The most important thing in all of this is to try to learn from mistakes.  I recommend that whenever you have a butt-pucker moment you find a safe place pull over and take the helmet off and think.  Ask yourself some questions:  What just happened?  What caused it?  Was it attention or judgment? What can I do to avoid that in the future?  I've been doing this for almost 30 years and it's just great.  I don't often make the same mistake twice, and you won't either if you stop and pay attention and get your lessons from your boo-boos.


If you can read this, thank your teacher,
If you read it in english, thank a sailor (or a soldier, it's all good)
If you thought it was funny, thank me!
 
Yeah, I'm a tree hugger.  I like trees.  Because I like breathing.

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GAJ
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   Posted 12/3/2008 11:57 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Excellent advice Cas; was this person trying to keep up with faster riders?

Always a bad idea.

But late apexing and slow entry are life savers on the street...as you point out.
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Smitty
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   Posted 12/3/2008 1:21 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Nice bit of info that should make sense & not to detailed.  Offering a person to LEARN from the advise.


Remember all the others on the road are crazy & out to kill you.

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Andy VH
Where is the earth shattering kaboom!?



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   Posted 12/3/2008 7:37 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Good stuff Casper, "sticky" quality actually. Assuming the rider does indeed really know how to make a motorcycle do what they want it to do, your comments do apply. A good many riders will not admit they don't know how to make a motorcycle follow exactly the path. So the first goal is to know what makes the bike move as the rider intends, instead of as the rider must react to mistakes caused by not knowing and using the right skills. Once past that, the real learning begins, and reflection on Attention or Judgement really benefits the rider. It also helps to build intuition about riding.

"Its easier to exit a corner fast after coming in slow, more than it is to come in fast and try to exit slow."


Training, the best safety and performance "equipment" you can get!
Get MSF trained, check out: http://www.msf-usa.org

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GAJ
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   Posted 12/8/2008 12:27 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Interested in what can happen when your judgement escapes you on a bike?

Find the "turned Ducatisti" thread by Luigi, experienced rider who lives in Puerto Rico and seems like a real decent guy.

Let's just say he's OK but the Ducati?

Not so much.
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Andy VH
Where is the earth shattering kaboom!?



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   Posted 1/27/2009 8:18 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
When your judgement escapes, I think the body takes over in the realm of "panic reaction", or the popular "knee jerk reaction", like when the doctor taps your knee with the little rubber hammer to watch your muscle reaction.

But in the painc reaction mode, it is very difficult to maintain accurate fine controls, make accurate split second judgements and reactions. Generally, the reactions tend to be large and over-powering, like locking your arms and squeezing the grips WAY to hard.

Generally, once judgement escapes you on a bike, in the next few micro-seconds, you'll be parting yourself from the bike and landing on something, hard. And your bike will be sliding/skidding/flying/flopping around until it shreds enough parts, and uses enough energy until it stops. Come to think of it, so will your body.


Training, the best safety and performance "equipment" you can get!
Get MSF trained, check out: http://www.msf-usa.org

Post Edited (Andy VH) : 4/6/2009 7:27:54 PM GMT

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