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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 6/3/2004 10:53 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Day 300
5871 miles
 
Update on the Caddmann Kit.
 
It's been five months and  some 2700 miles since I did this mod on my Nomad. The paper elements still look pretty clean (though not new) and have no apparent degradation from a few rides I did in the rain. 
 
I pulled the air cleaner covers today and removed the elements to check for dirt. It appears that the filters are sealing well, as there was no dirt tracking anywhere around the edges. There was a small film of oil around the breather tube, but no more than would be expected.
 
I did however find a little film of dust (very fine) had entered around the joint between the left backing plate and the crossover duct. The gasket Kawasaki uses there isn't too substantial, and the blow-molded plastic crossover tube doesn't provide the world's most perfect sealing surface either. I recommend that a bit of sealant be used here when removing the left backing plate. The right plate which had never been removed from the duct did not show any dust at the duct joint. All the screws were still tight.
 
There was a bit of carbon around the butterflies, as expected, but very minimal.
 
Several other fellows on three forums have told me that they did this mod, and were very happy with the results, as I am also. It would be interesting to know how many folks here have done it, so if you have please post a reply.
 
Thanks,
 
CaddmannQ
AKA
MadNadMann


Cadd
Clovis CA
VROC #11619
2004 Nomad

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 6/12/2004 8:08 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Day 309
6048 miles

The Flintstone...errr...BRIDGEstone rear tire on the Nomad is shot. It's still got some tread in the middle, but the shoulders are so cupped, it's like the road changes to cobblestones when you lean it over in a turn. I could turn it backwards and put it on a dirt bike. As we are riding to Yosimite Monday I decide to put a new tire on today.

Anyhow, the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly....

The good:
I walked into the local stealer, and they had Metzlers on sale 30% off, and had an ME880 150/80HB-16 for $148 + tax. That's about $25 less than the internet prices, and no shipping or waiting. I jumped all over that baby. It was exactly the tire I wanted, and only $21 additional for mounting and balancing if I took them the loose rim.

The Bad:
Nobody in town would mount it today. Next week is the "Rumble to the Summit" and everybody's got their bike in the shop this weekend. Oh, well, I wanted an excuse to mount and balance it myself. This is a big stiff tire, but I'd done Harley tires before, so no problem. This was the first tubeless M/C tire I've done however, and the beads were a bitch to break loose. I used lots of RuGlyde (rubberlube) a 12" C-clamp, an 18" tire iron, my knees, and a big drift that I had Pupus smack with a ball-peen hammer. Installing the new tire was much easier, accomplished with RuGlyde, my hands, and a QuikStik (little plastic tire iron for bicycles.) Also, no liner or tube to diddle with was a big blessing, and the new beads sealed and seated with no fuss once I put the air hose to it.

I cobbled up a stand out of scrap lumber with a screw gun and balanced the wheel. It took one 20 gram weight and came out almost perfect. I spun it and marked 12 times to find the light spot, started adding weight, and spun and marked it another 38 times before I was satisfied with my weight and placement. I used lead slip sinkers and scotch tape until I got a good total, and then put a real M/C wheel weight on it. That's a heavy assembly with the tire, wheel, stem, brake disc, splines, bearings, and rubber cushion, and it has really good bearings too. It spun like a dream on the stand.


TheUgly:
My rear pads. I'm glad I checked this today. I hadn't looked at the rear brake pads in a while, and they're almost at the service limit of 1mm. Constant in-town riding takes its toll on brakes and tires. Most Nomads get at least 8000 from a set of rear pads.

YES, I do use the FRONT brakes too, but there's twice as many of them & they are only half as worn. I could have bought pads today, but the stealer wantd a fortune for them. I'll check around first.

I cleaned up the stuff you can't clean with the bags mounted, and put it all back together, then went out and scrubbed off the rear tire a bit. It's nice. It'll get a matching front the next time they go on sale.


Cadd
Clovis CA
VROC #11619
2004 Nomad

Post Edited (CaddmannQ) : 6/13/2004 3:14:48 AM GMT

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 7/7/2004 11:03 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Day 334
6651 miles

I finally changed the rear brake pads last Sunday (July 4th). They were finally down to the 1mm wear limit, though the fronts have about 3mm left. I guess you can tell which brake I use the most. Since most of my riding is in town, and I ALWAYS touch the rear brake first, I didn't expect to get much more than that out of the rear pucks.

Unfortunately Bikebandit screwed up in their catalog, as they claim these pads are for L2 thru L5 nomads, but are really the thinner pads for the pre-L2 bikes. They fit, but they just wont last as long. Fortunately I bought a spare set, and even with shipping two sets were cheaper than just one set from the dealer.

I spent about 3 hours cleaning and polishing the entire bike, and even disassembled the entire winshield assembly so I could clean between the adjustable lexan panels.

I checked the oil, and she's hardly used a drop in 1600 miles.

I also tightened the rubber engine mounts, which were just slightly loose (well not sloppy loose, but about 12 ft-lb under spec) and checked the swingarm bolt which was probably over-tight from the factory, as it didn't budge.

A few more guys from the Vulcan forum have told me they did the Caddmann kit and are very happy with the performance and value. One guy was even from Australia, and another from Korea.

I still haven't bought any coasters to block off the reed valves, which is stupid as they're only about $35. I'll order some tomorrow, and try to have them on before HSVROC on the 30th.

I bought two new air filter elements fromKragens for $7 each, as the old ones are looking a bit dingy after 3500 miles. They still work well though, so I'll save the clean ones and put them on just before the ride up to Topaz lake for the VROC rally.

I almost bought a pair of K&N's for about $90, but I just don't think the bike would benefit from any more air without a hotter cam or more compression. My setup has got to flow 3 times as much air as the single tiny stock filter as it is: in other words, it's already overkill. I'd be spending a lot of money just so I could have red filter elements on a blue and silver bike.

The Metzler tire is so much nicer than the old Bridgestone I can't believe the difference. The next time they go on sale, I'm definately buying the matching front, even though mine still has 85% tread left.

Hey, everybody needs a spare, and in a pinch it'll work on the rear too. I haven't owned a bike with the same size tires front and rear since my '61 Lambretta scooter.

Every time I look at the hardbags on the Nomad, they remind me of the big skirts on that old Lambretta. Same sorta drooping-teardrop profile. Always makes me wonder where the designer got his inspiration for those bags... ;-)


Cadd
Clovis CA
VROC #11619
2004 Nomad

Post Edited (CaddmannQ) : 7/8/2004 6:07:24 AM GMT

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Puppy
"ugly" is a form of birthcontrol.



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   Posted 7/8/2004 10:49 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
3 hours cleaning & polishing!

Cadd there is no doubt that you have been bitten by the bug!

Love the blog man, keep updating it.


-Richard.
 
"Republicans want everyday to be like the fourth of July, Democrats want everyday to be like April the 15th" - Ronald Reagan.

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 7/21/2004 10:08 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Day 348
7008 miles

I finally broke down and removed the idle control solenoids from the Nomad. I'd disconnected their electrical connections when I did the dual air filter mod, as they were noisy and annoying at low speeds, and really they did nothing except raise the idle speed when the engine was cold: something my right hand does equally well.

Well, I though that was all they did.

They work by bypassing air around the butterflies in the throttle body, but while I supposed that they were normally closed unless activated, evidently they are normally open unless activated. Perhaps they were designed that way since they can be closed faster than they can be opened, but it seems backwards to me to require constant current to these things unless they actually need to operate. (Urrrrgh! This is evidently NOT correct. Please see my "mea culpa" below..Cadd.)

The bottom line is that they were requiring me to richen up the off-idle mixture in such a way that smoothness and gas mileage both suffered a bit. Though it seemed smooth enough to me untill I removed them and plugged the ports, I didn't know just how smooth it could be until they were gone.

Immediately I was able to lean the idle mix, and richen the acceleration mix, which was a win-win all around. As it was, the bike was running a bit lean at some points because of poor metering, and a bit rich at others for the same reason. Now the metering is much smoother at idle and off-idle, and a tiny bit better at moderate cruise also. The bike seems to run a bit cooler, and doesn't rap as loudly on sharp decceleration either.

I'm not sure why I've put off trying this for so long, as removal took all of 3 minutes, and is reversable in the same time if I ever need to pass a smog check. In addition, their absence increases the air volume inside the right filter housing, and probably reduces turbulance there as well. This may have some affect on the top end, but so far I haven't been brave enough to flaunt the considerable local traffic enforcement by doing another 100+ MPH test run.

It will undoubtably have some positive effect on fuel mileage, and I will report back on that once I've run a few tanks through the bike. The High sierra VROC rally is coming up on the 30th, and that means a five hour ride each way, so that will be the real test. In addition, once I hit the open desert, I will probably open it up to top speed for a bit and see how she performs.


Cadd
Clovis CA
VROC #11619
2004 Nomad

Post Edited (CaddmannQ) : 7/22/2004 3:00:29 PM GMT

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 7/22/2004 7:58 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Mea Culpa...Urrrgh!

I realized this morning that I never actually tested those solenoids while disconnected, and I just did that. I was wrong.

Evidently, unless they have some thermostatic componant that I could not activate with the mere heat of my cigar, they DO NOT pass air unless activated electrically. At least I can neither blow nor suck air through them by mouth.

Now I am at a total loss to explain why the bike runs better with them removed, unless the total effect is just due to a reduction of turbulance within the filter housing, and the accompanying increase in internal air volume with them gone.

Can anybody shed some more light on this?


Cadd
Clovis CA
VROC #11619
2004 Nomad

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louemc
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   Posted 7/22/2004 1:49 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Hummm, The dealer that sold the Metzeler (great choice by the way) was too busy to mount it? And nothing like doing that work yourself to make $21.00 look like a bargain. So are you going to have matched tires when you do the trip over the mountain? I'm hoping you can give a twisty report on the difference between stock tires and the Metzeler's. :-)


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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 7/22/2004 6:18 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Actually the front tire apears that it will outlast two rears, so I won't replace it until the next rear change. At that point, i'll buy a matched set of the latest Metzlers.

So far I've been up and down the mountains twice with this setup, and the handling was fine. The tires on this bike were never the limiting factor in cornering anyway. There's an inch of tread on each edge that will never see pavement unless I hit a pothole, because the floorboards touch down first.


Cadd
Clovis CA
VROC #11619
2004 Nomad

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 8/24/2004 7:29 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Day 382
8259 miles
 
Well I've owned the Nomad one year as of a week ago Sunday, and I still get the same charge as the first time I threw a leg over it. More, in fact, as it runs better now, and I can ride it a bit more competantly after a year of nearly daily riding.
 
I changed the oil and filter again. I let it go a little longer than usual this time (3191 miles between changes), but the oil was still quite clear, plus it's expensive synthetic and would probably go much longer without breakdown. The strainer showed no evidence of debris whatsoever.
 
At 7500 miles the driveshaft is supposed to get lubed, but I think I'll wait a bit longer. I've heard that the stock grease lasts a lot longer than the recommended interval, so I am not worried about wear. Besides, it's pretty well sealed up, and immune from dust. That would be my real worry around here.
 
Polished the paint and chrome, and looked at the radiator. I should probably wash it out with a hose soon, as it's collected a little dust. The fins on that radiator are the finest ( close-patterned) of any radiator I've ever looked at. I'm surprised there's not a bunch of bugs plugging it up after my trip to Topaz and Tahoe. We hit flocks of big moths on the mountain that were bouncing off of the windshield, helmet, etc.
 
The tw0-piece windshield isn't my favorite though. There's a gap about 0.010" between the two sheets of Lexan, and it collects dirt that you cannot easily remove. There's about 14 little bolts required to remove and dissasemble it to clean in there, so it doesn't get much attention. So far I've done it twice in a year. When this windshield is scratched up and ready to junk, I think I will put a single piece Lexan in it. I might have to cut and polish it myself to get what I want, but there's no need for adjustments once it's set where I need it.
 
Bike running great, not much else to tell, except I'm looking for some driving lights, but haven't found just the right ones yet.


Cadd
Clovis CA
VROC #11619
2004 Nomad

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 11/16/2004 2:12 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Day 466
10,000 miles

Exactly. The Nomad rolled over 10,000 as I pulled into the parking lot at work this morning. I think I'll have a beer!

Oops...No beer for me. Still at work until six.

Anyhow, the Nomad has been running like a top except for one niggling thing. It's still seeping coolant. It appears that I'll need to change the water pump gasket sometime in the next year, as it leaks about one drop per day, after the engine gets hot. It's not hitting the floor, but I can smell it when that drop evaporates on the hot engine.

The rear brake pads will need changing soon. In-town riding seems to take its toll on that poor rear brake.

The weather is dipping into the high 40's at night now, so it won't be long before it starts dipping into the 30's. Time to put some winter oil in it. The synthetic 15w-50 is just too thick for those cold mornings.

The rubber on the throttle grip is starting to peel loose a bit. Maybe I'll get me some ISO grips for Christmas.

I bought a set of Kawasaki chromed caliper and rotor covers, which will dress up the front end a lot. At $250 a set they evidently weren't selling well, but I got a set on close-out sale for $50! Couldn't pass that up.

I'll need to turn an adaptor sleeve for the left axle spacer to mount them though, as these covers were only manufactured for bikes with a mechanical speedometer drive there, and mine is electronic. Other than that, they will bolt right up. Just what my bike needs: more unsprung weight. eyes

I did get rained on going home from work a few times this fall, as the prediction of "possible showers" just wasn't frightening enough to make me want to take the car. We did have a few severe showers (new one-day record rainfall for Fresno) and I actually did drive the car to work three time in the past 30 days. Otherwise, I'm only driving the car to pick up large items or for major grocery runs.

In the time it took me to put 10k on the Nomad, I managed to drive my Pontiac almost 600 miles. Woulda been less than that, except that someone hit the bumper, and I had to take it back and forth to the body shop a couple times.


Cadd
VROC #11619
2004 Nomad

Post Edited (CaddmannQ) : 11/16/2004 9:15:02 PM GMT

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 12/4/2004 7:41 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Day 484

10,247 miles

Being unable to pass up the sale price of Kawasaki's chrome front brake covers, I ordered a set figuring I could make them work on a FI Nomad, even though according to Kawasaki they would not fit.

Well, they're on, and they look good; but I had to make them fit, and the "making" part of the job was rather involved.

In fact, I'd advise against doing it if anybody else here has taken the notion. There are some subtle differences between the Nomad with the mechanical speedometer, and mine which is electronic, in addition to the aforementioned speedo gearbox adaptor.

In short: Unless you are daring, have some machine tools handy, and are willing to risk grinding on your forks, I'd forget the whole thing.

First I had to make the adaptor sleeve to make up the difference in diameter between the stock axle spacer and the right side disc cover. I didn't have a lathe handy, but I made one from an ordinary aluminum shaft collar, turned the O.D. down just a smidgen using my little drill press as an Okie lathe, and buffed it out to a nice shine. The I.D. was .080 bigger than my axle spacer, so I made a thin shim to take up the difference. I pressed the whole thing together with a 2X4, a plastic pipe fitting, and a 2 lb. hammer. and everything fit up nice antight. Too tight in fact. When I tightened the set screws on the collar to the spacer it distorted the OD a bit, and I had to dress it off round again, and buff it a little more. I set the collar, shim, and all the set screws in blue loc-tite.

Then I test fit it to the forks, and found an interference between the lower fork leg and the chrome plated boss welded to the right disc cover. I could have ground off the chrome collar a bit (ugh!) but figgured there was enough meat in the fork leg to grind a small relief, and so I did so. Funny thing, the little tabs for the mechanical speedo are still cast into the right fork leg, so I figgured that a lillte meat lost there was no problem.

Even so, I was very cautious grinding the leg, and used a 1/4" pneumatic die grinder with a 1" dia medium grit stone. I worked out pretty well, and you can't see the grind mark when the bike is assembled.

Here's some pictures of the finished product. there's a small cutout in the right cover for the speedo cable which isn't there, but you don't notice it unless you get down to a close undershot like this.

Sorry for the dark pics, but it was very overcast today & I had to use the flash. Better pics to be posted when the weather clears up.


Cadd
VROC #11619
2004 Nomad

Post Edited (CaddmannQ) : 12/5/2004 7:42:36 PM GMT


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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 12/5/2004 9:22 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
In the second pic above, you can see the relief I ground in the leg, reflected in the chrome cover.

I gave this it's own thread, with more pics....Cadd.

http://forum.motorcycle-usa.com/default.aspx?f=25&m=123238


Cadd
VROC #11619
2004 Nomad

Post Edited (CaddmannQ) : 12/5/2004 7:41:44 PM GMT

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 1/16/2005 8:35 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Day 527
10,655 miles
 
I finally changed the water pump gasket today.
 
It had been seeping a tiny bit under pressure (about one drop each time I rode the bike) for months, but as it was so minor I let it slide until I had the time and inclination to replace the gasket; also, time to actually go get the gasket. I had added a total of 4 ounces of coolant in over 10,000 miles, but the surge tank had actually never dropped more than 1/4" below the full-cold mark.
 
The gasket was $10.85 (yikes! I was figuring maybe $5...) from the local Kawasaki dealer, and I had to look at a couple to find one that wasn't already damaged right from the parts bin. You'd think that a gasket so dang expensive would deserve a package more protective than a little baggie. I probably would have forgone the gasket and used RTV alone, had I known the price in advance, but what the heck. I was already there and had cherry picked the available gaskets too.
 
The first thing I noticed was that the package indicated this gasket was an improved model, and in fact it was identical in all appearance except that it was about twice as thick. It was factory coated in what appeared to be silver silicone sealant, as was the original gasket.
 
One of the four screws holding the water pump cover on is also one of the main coolant drains so I didn't bother to remove the radiator drain or any hoses, as I knew I'd be dripping coolant all over the engine anyway. The coolant removed was exceptionally clean, so I decided to just replace whatever came out and not flush & drain the entire system.
 
First I tied the forks back to the crash bars on both sides with a substantial rope, so the handlebars couldn't flop into the tank once it was raised. I removed the seat, gauge trim bezel and gauge cluster, unbolted the tank and hoisted the front up about 8 inches with a small rope over a rafter. This does not require removing any fuel hoses.
 
The right air filter, and backing plate had to be removed for easy access to the pump. The front header pipe is close to the pump, but still far enough to use a small ratchet on the cover bolts.
 
The second thing I noticed was that not only did the lower rear (drain) bolt on the cover have an aluminum crush washer on it, but so did the upper rear. I don't know why, as no coolant came out of its hole. I'd neglected to buy a new crush washer, but just cleaned up the old ones and used some high-temp RTV sealant on assembly. I put some sealant on all four screws just for security.
 
The most crucial part of the job is cleaning the gasket surfaces, as they are small, highly finished, and must not be scratched. Fortunately the old gasket came off easily and in one piece. Very little residue remained on the engine case, and it cleaned up with just a cotton rag and a little rubbing.
 
The cover was another thing. Here I noticed that some of the pump cover paint had lapped over onto parts of the gasket surface and had not been removed before asembly. Was it this minor assembly fault that was causing the seepage (and the reason for the "improved" gasket?) I removed some of it with a rag, but some was stuck tight. I ground a plastic toothbrush handle into a scraper, and (not daring to apply steel to the aluminum cover) removed as much of the offending paint as possible.
 
Still some remained, and so I resorted to sanding it off with a tiny scrap of 380 grit wet & dry sandpaper. After sanding a bit everything looked perfect, so I cleaned it all up and polished the surfaces off a bit more with a rag before installing the new gasket.
 
After assembly, I washed the coolant off the engine cases and buffed them thoroughly dry, so as to detect any leakage. I mixed the new coolant with purified water and poured it into one pint water bottles, as a gallon jug would not reach the filler cap (residing under the semi-raised fuel tank) without removing the windshield.
 
Refilling the system took three pints, which was seemed about what had drained out. I decided to run the engine to purge air bubbles before replacing the tank and gauges, but here I was presented with a quandry. Would the bike even run without the gauge cluster plugged into the harness? I decided that it would, as failed gauges and idiot lights should be no excuse for the engine shutting down. It fired up on the first try.
 
I ran the bike on high idle for about one minute, but surprizingly no significant bubbles appeared. Taking this as a good omen, I capped the filler, and replaced the tank, gauges, trim bezel, and seat.
 
I measured the coolant that I'd drained and found it to be almost exactly three pints, minus a dab I'd dribbled on the floor, and took that as another good omen. Even so, I added a few extra ounces to the surge tank just for the heck of it; still leaving plenty of expansion room free. A test run showed no leakage, though only time will tell if the seepage is permanently fixed. It's only 42 F here today, and when it hits 100 F+ this Summer that will tell the real story.
 
Aw, who am I kidding? Nothing is permanent. Any water-cooled engine will eventually leak again. Someday. But not someday soon, thank you.
 
While the air filter was off I decided to take the left one off too, and blow them out and re-oil them. They weren't actually dirty, but I think I could have used a bit more oil on them the first time, and one was already off, so what the heck.
 
While the seat was off, I looked at the harness for chaffed wires (none,) and checked the battery terminals (very clean.) Tires and brake pads all looked very good, and no oil leaks were noticed anywhere.


Cadd
VROC #11619
2004 Nomad

Post Edited (CaddmannQ) : 1/17/2005 3:41:04 AM GMT

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 1/18/2005 2:53 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Just one further comment. From running the ignition with the gauges unplugged my trip odometer reset to zero (The main odometer did not of course) and the clock lost exactly 1 hour 20 minutes, which was the total time it was unplugged.


Cadd
VROC #11619
2004 Nomad

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 1/23/2005 10:30 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

Gadget and the Caddmann Kit.

I've got a lot of good feedback about the performance and simplicity of the Caddmann kit since I posted the instructions on the web.

One of my buds with a Nomad is Go Go Gadget, who is a dedicated Vulcan guy, and hosts a web page of Nomad tips, tricks and info: http://www.gadgetjq.com/gadgetsfixitpage.htm

Anyhow, Gadget did my intake mods, opened up his exhaust, and installed a TFI. This is the same as my bike now, except I actually have V&H pipes & his are punched out stockers.

He ran it 15 runs on the Dynojet yesterday, and netted a 23.8% HP boost and 11.6% torque boost at the wheel, and the area under both curves became much broader; the torque curve exceptionally so. They did one baseline run stock, and then achieved 99% of the final result on the very first real run: 62.4 hp & 81.1 ft-lbs. (pic below)

This is a well needed boost on the Nomad, which is only about 50 hp & 72 ft-lbs at the rear wheel, stock.

Another buddy, Top Dawg, did this to his 1600 Vulcan, with almost identical results when run on Barron's Dynojet down in LA. His 1600cc gained one more HP than Gadget's 1500cc.

Now here's the kicker: When another of my Nomad buddys called Techlusion for their recommended settings, they told him: "We aren't seeing the greatest results with the Caddmann Kit."  shocked 

If 23.8% isn't a great result, I sure as hell want to know what is! I'll buy it!

I don't think they even tested my mods, personally. Techlusion has arrangements with a lot of distributors that sell induction kits. They all cost $200 to $400 (not including the TFI) where mine cost about $30.

Geee...I wonder why they said that about mine. eyes :-) eyes

PS: Gadget's Nomad had 50,000 miles on it when he made these runs. Pretty impressive.


Cadd
VROC #11619
2004 Nomad

Post Edited (CaddmannQ) : 1/24/2005 5:35:15 AM GMT


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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 1/25/2005 3:04 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

A couple more notes:

While Gadget's Nomad dynoed 50.4 HP, that was with modified exhaust. Stock Nomads are reputed to deliver 54 HP.

This means (if the dyno was accurate) that the HP increase was only 8.4 which is an increase of 15.5%.

I should have suspected this up front, as really, a 23% increase would be phenomonal at this cost. 15.5% would only be "wonderful". lol

Top Dawg's increase works out to 19.8% by the way, which is closer to "miraculous".  cool

Well, I base that on the HP quotes in Motor Cycle News, as he didn't do a stock baseline either.



Cadd
2004 Nomad 1500
VROC #11619  Rolling Blunder #128

 

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 2/21/2005 7:26 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

Day 563

11,077 miles

 

I finally tore my swingarm down and did the driveshaft and swingarm lube job.

Kawasaki recommends this service at 7500 miles & every 15,000 thereafter. Many guys in the Vulcan forums have delayed this service 'til 20K, 30K & even 40K+ miles and reported no problems, but some folks noted a decidedly tiny volume of grease installed at the factory, while others noted that on 4 or 5 year-old bikes with only 5k or 10K miles the grease had hardened inside the driveshaft splines. I figured I'd delayed it long enough at 11K, and I'm really glad I tore it down now.

Rain had been predicted, so of course it was nice and sunny the day I'd planned to do this. Only 10 minutes into the project I was wishing I'd gone riding instead. As soon as the rear wheel came off, that all changed. I found two nails in the rear tire. Both were tiny finishing nails and one did not puncture the carcass. The other one did. Damn. Only 4500 miles on that Metzler, so I decided to put a plug in it and just keep it in town until I get new tires for this summer's touring season. Hell, as much as I'm working lately, I won't have time to hit the highway for a while anyway, plus the weather's been crummy.

I always advise changing tires after any puncture, so why am I going to squeek another 2000 miles out of this tire before replacing it? My daily ride is flat, level, and perfectly straight: 10 miles each way. The speed limit is 40 MPH the whole way, and if I have a sudden flat while riding I'm not going to be sailing off a mountain road at 70 MPH into the wild blue yonder.

Aside from the dang nail, the second worse part of the job was removing the circlip (retaining ring) that retains the driveshaft coupler. I had two pair of K-D split ring pliers and neither would work. I went out and bought 3 more pairs (Craftsman, in two different styles) and none of them would work either. The ring is inside a tubular splined coupler, and  farther in than any would reach. An hour later and $45 poorer, I got it out with my baby needlenose pliers usually reserved for computer work.

There are three sets of splines on the shaft, and one on the hub-to-wheel flange, and while none were dry, the grease on the shaft was liquified and nearly gone. I cleaned everything and re-greased with Mobil-1 synthetic grease. No dirt, wear, chips or anything unusual was found. All the splines still fit up nice and snug, and the u-joint felt perfect.

When removing the u-joint from the rear of the transmission to grease its splines, there is a tiny spring-loaded pin that retains the joint. You press it in with a pick, pull the yoke off the splines, and then that little pin shoots across the garage like a bullet. I was prepared, and snagged that little sucker with a rag as I pulled the yoke loose. The front splines looked perfect, but had virtually NO grease on them from the factory. Still they weren't worn at all, as there's virtually no movement at that joint. Mostly you grease there to prevent rust. Never-Sieze might be a better choice there, but again I used Mobil-1.

There was still plenty of grease in the swingarm bearings, but I re-greased them just the same. Heck, it was already apart, and at that point "apart" meant there's 25 bolts or nuts to remove the bags, left muffler/bag supports and muffler, left shock, wheel, brake caliper & support, axle, final drive gearcase, and swingarm.

The third worse part of the job was re-fitting the rubber boot over the u-joint, which was a total pain. there's just not enough room on the frame side to get my fingers back there. It's still not exactly right, and so I'll have to play with it a bit more before I ride again. We're having rain through Thursday, so no rush at this point.

Other than that boot, everything went back together like a charm. No buggered nuts, no stripped bolts, no dinged threads or lost parts.  Life could be worse, eh?



Cadd
2004 Nomad 1500
VROC #11619  Rolling Blunder #128

 

Post Edited (CaddmannQ) : 2/22/2005 2:29:31 AM GMT

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 2/23/2005 1:31 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
One further comment:

I also changed the final drive oil, which had about 7000 miles on it.

I was using Penzoil HP-GL5 80w-90 and switched to Mobil-1 75w-90.

The difference was felt immediately. The bike rolls easier, runs better, and shifts smoother; and I guarantee that gas mileage will increase.


Cadd
2004 Nomad 1500
VROC #11619  Rolling Blunder #128

 

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erniexx
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   Posted 3/13/2005 2:55 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Hey Cadd if i put baggers on my nomad you say i will have to also buy the compterized tuninng system?


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     Erniexx

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erniexx
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   Posted 3/13/2005 4:26 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
jumpin waiting for warm weather


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     Erniexx


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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 3/13/2005 5:59 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
erniexx said...
Hey Cadd if i put baggers on my nomad you say i will have to also buy the compterized tuninng system?
Not if that's all you do. Performance, however, will be disappointing with just the pipes. It will sound better though.
 
I bought the fuel module first, and then did the pipes and air. the bike definately ran better with just the module.
 
Welcome to the forums, Ernie.


Cadd
2004 Nomad 1500
VROC #11619  Rolling Blunder #128

 

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louemc
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   Posted 3/24/2005 12:34 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Wow Cadd the Man, the work you have done is very impressive, very very impressive :-)
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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 3/24/2005 12:42 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Aw, hell, Lou...It ain't THAT impressive.

I'm just a hobbiest.

But 35 years of tinkering does teach you some.


Cadd
2004 Nomad 1500
VROC #11619  Rolling Blunder #128

 

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louemc
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   Posted 3/24/2005 1:37 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Uh-huh, Just a hobbiest, tinkering. What can I say? Some tinker better than others? A humble hobbiest that has 35 years of experience, honing the tinker to professional levels. That would look good on a business card :-)
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   Posted 4/3/2005 9:27 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Day 604
11,564 miles
 
Changed the rear tire, and rear brake pads today.
 
I've been riding 41 days with a plug in my rear tire. It has shown no signs of weakening; but I've had a new tire in the garage waiting for three weeks now, so I finally found the time to change it.
 
I discovered that my 1959 model Craftsman tire spoons (inheirited from Dad, *snif*) have been snatched from my mom's garage a couple weeks back, and I've been looking around town for some new tire irons. Evidently nobody here has changed their own tire since The Grapes of Wrath, and you can't find them for sale anywhere. I'd have to order them. In fact, three different people in tool stores (including Sears) had no clue what a tire iron was, and instead showed me a lug wrench!
 
Soooo.... with ol' Bob Stienbeck's tale firmly in mind, I whittled a pair of genuine Okie tire spoons out of a real oak broom handle. Well, I had it a little easier than that actually. The "whittling" was accomplished with an electric grinder, and an orbital sander.
 
You can't lean on them like those Chrome-Vanadium Steel spoons from Sears, but If you have to pry too hard, you're doing it wrong. Tire work is an art of slow, friendly persuasion. That and lots of rubber lube.
 
As you'll see from the pics, they go quite well with my Oakie bead breaker. Not as fast as a Coates, but about $4995.00 cheaper and just as effective after liberal applications of genuine Rubber-Lube.
 
Pictures in order are:
 
1. Nad up for service
2. the Okie bead breaker in action
3. genuine oak tire spoons in action
4. balancing the tire the old fashioned way
5. closeup of the complicated & sturdy Nomad crash-bar/muffler-mount/spreader-bar/bag-mount system, with the bag removed.
 
(PS: That yellow stuff over the wheel is Saran-Wrap, greased in place, to keep the dirt & Rubber-Lube out of the splines.)


Cadd
2004 Nomad 1500
VROC #11619  Rolling Blunder #128

 

Post Edited (CaddmannQ) : 4/4/2005 4:34:28 AM GMT


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