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H-BOMB
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   Posted 6/23/2007 6:29 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

OH YEAH !!

WTF??

Finished the install, the caddmann kit is awesome, the wild-thing performs perfectly(thanks for the settings again),and the V&H Baggers are onafter a few words and a bout with the dremel tool they fit great(you would expect a little more quality in the fit for the money)but after all the dust settled    @ 2200 last night WOW!

Installed phat II risers from scootworks love 'em!

fire it up,wake the neighbors ( GOOD STUFF ) HA HA HA!

BLAST down the road and then WTF?HUH? Stop for gas and the gremlins strike! Flat rear tire! So now Pandora sits in the car port covered waiting to be summoned again.

Thanks for all the help, ride it like ya stole it!

later bros,h-bomb.

 

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 6/25/2007 7:43 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Tubless tires is a big reason why I chose a Nomad. I've plugged them before, and even though I've had two flats from nails in 4 years, I've never had to tow the bike. Of course that also means I've carried a compressor and plug kit on about 1500 days that I didn't need it, just for the two that I did, but also that in ten minutes I was back on the road each time.


"When in doubt, ride."
Cadd................................Clovis CA
2004 Nomad 1500............"Baggins"
VROC #11619 Rolling Blunder #128

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H-BOMB
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   Posted 7/7/2007 8:15 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

shocked 

I finally got to ride today for the first time since I had the flat. Not because of the tire, but because of the weather. S.E. Texas has had about 20 days of rain in a row.(hmm mabey it's time to research Nomad pontoons? )

Anyway this is a different bike now! This is what 1600cc's should feel and sound likedevil My next quest is to try and squeeze more out of the motor mabey new cams? Right now I'll just ride and enjoy the new found power.

if your ridin' near Beaumont Tx. shoot me a message.

See ya on the road

h-bomb.

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H-BOMB
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   Posted 7/31/2007 2:59 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Can anyone tell me if I remove the baffles from my classic baggers, do I need to reset my T.F.I. unit?
 
Thanks.
h-bomb.
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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 8/19/2007 8:29 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
H-BOMB said...
Can anyone tell me if I remove the baffles from my classic baggers, do I need to reset my T.F.I. unit?
 
Thanks.
h-bomb.
 
Well I missed this question completely, as I've been very busy at work and home and hardly had time to post on the forums.
 
I hope you got this doped out, but basically the answer is "probably".
 
I've played around a lot with the TFI settings in the past 3 1/2 years and I've come to find out two things: it's real easy to set it up too rich and almost everyone does. I did at first as well, and have backed off the settings a few times. Second, almost any change you make in the engine will show the bennefit of some minor adjustment. Something like taking out the baffles would warrant a small adjustment of the first & second pots, and the evidence would be right off if the idle speed changes. Second pot evidence would simply be any increase in roll-on power in 2nd & third gear when you do adjust that pot.
 
The bike will thump off the line a little better with a rich setting of the first pot, but you will find the idle & light cruise to be a bit too rich and gas mileage will suffer because of that.


"When in doubt, ride."
Cadd................................Clovis CA
2004 Nomad 1500............"Baggins"
caddmannq at yahoo dot com

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 8/19/2007 8:58 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Day 1465
27,881 miles

Somewhere I screwed up in my calculations by over two weeks (!), as I originally came up with "day 1450" for this. Well, Baggins actually turned 4 years old on the 15th (4 days ago) and I might not have realised that fact had Max from New Zealand not been looking at my bike and asked me on that day how long I'd had her. I didn't mention that Baggins is a "he" and not a "she" because I was so shocked to find it to be his official "birthday".

Anyhow, it's a tribute to this machine and it's maker that it's required so little maintenance and my blogs are few and far between. I haven't ridden it as much this year (too busy) but just about 3000 miles in the last 182 (more or less) days.
 
There are a few things I forgot to log here. I changed the rear brake pads about 150 miles ago, and disked off the rotor with the DA sander, as well as removing the ridge at the edge with an small grinder. I used the stock (thick) pads from Kawasaki this time, which were a present from Top Dawg for helping him fix his bike. I also lubed the controls and cables. I used some spray-can white grease on the cables, but didn't like it (too stiff once set in) and so washed it through with some 3-in1 oil, which is what I've typically used in the past.

Anyhow it was time to change the oil & filter, so I did, using my typical Mobil-1 15w-50 oil & the SuperTech oil filter. I found a couple small chunks of what looks like casting flash trapped in the oil strainer screen and a few small bits of what appears to be gasket sealant. I've never cut up any of the previous 10 oil filters to see what they've caught, but I think I will cut this one to examine it for metal & dirt. The oil color, when drained, seemed quite normal, and smelled still quite viable.

I also re-packed the glasspack mufflers, as they were sounding rather raspy. About half the fiberglass was burned out of each. I used a roll of ThermoKing pipe wrap insulation on each baffle, just winding them tightly as with tape, and between the layers I incorporated what viable pieces remained of the previous packing; so they are packed somewhat tighter this time. I did a test ride, and they sound much more mellow than they do with half the packing missing. sorry, no photos of the process, but it's really quite easy once the baffles are out. To get them out I removed the two small bolts holding each baffle and knocked them out gently with a small slide hammer having a hook on the end.

I should change the coolant, but to do so I'll have to remove the tank, and when I do that I want to re-seal the coolant pipes to each head, as I think one of them is seeping slightly. (And has been for years, so it must be very slight. I never notice any coolant on the engine.) Also I should replace both the front brake fluid and the clutch fluid, and while I'm at that I will replace the front pads as well. I'm still on the factory original pads and they're getting rather thin. I should change the fork oil as well, which is a horribly involved procedure, but it definately needs it.
 
Baggins needs a good wash and polish too. When you ride 5 to 7 days a week it's hard to keep them really clean, and he's rather far from it right now.

That all sounds like a lot of work, and I doubt I'll get the motivation to do any of it today.


"When in doubt, ride."
Cadd................................Clovis CA
2004 Nomad 1500............"Baggins"
caddmannq at yahoo dot com

Post Edited (CaddmannQ) : 8/19/2007 4:11:10 PM GMT

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 8/19/2007 10:46 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Day 1465
27,881 miles

I got a friend over this afternoon and we tried to track down my coolant seepage issue. This was one of my reservations about buying a liquid cooled bike, and unfortunately while the Nomad has a pretty solid cooling system it has one weak spot that is the result of poor design. Fortunately it can be fixed cheaply. Unfortunately it's a pain to do.

The issue is the coolant pipe going into the top of each head, which connects the radiator hoses to the heads. These are short steel tubes with a single o-ring on the end which plug into a hole bored into the top of the head. They are retained by a single small bolt each, which connects a tab (welded to the steel pipe) to the head.

Unfortunately, as the cylinders vibrate up and down on this big v-twin, they are shaking that pipe in and out of it's bore just a little, and the o-rings eventually (quite quickly in fact) wear down and start to seep coolant. The little tab and bolt arrangement is not in line with this motion, but transverse to it, and simply does not do enough to restrain the coolant pipe firmly.

My sollution: a new o-ring and silicone glue.

I only managed to repair one of the pipes today, and I did the one that appears to have been suffering 90% of the seepage. This seepage is very minor, and some owners may never even notice it. I typically have been adding only about 8 ounces of coolant per year to this bike. That tiny amount of seepage evaporates from a hot engine before ever hitting the ground, nor even any place on the engine where it becomes easily visible.

This is part of what makes it a bear to repair: it's burried under a lot of junk and takes lots of effort to get to. I had to remove the windshield, gage trim. gages, seat, and gas tank. Removing the gast tank involves unplugging two very reluctant electrical connectors to the gages and fuel level float, and the detachment of 6 hoses on the fuel system: two vent hoses, an overflow hose, a vapor recovery hose, the fuel return hose, and the main fuel hose to the injectors.

Four of those hoses are under the tank, and I needed a friend to hold the tank a few inches above the frame for five minutes so I could detatch them. They don't give you a lot of slack to work with. Have a rubber cap ready to cap off the gas when you detatch the main fuel hose, as it will leak quite a bit if you don't. I did, as I was expecting this. I also took pains to run the tank almost dry the day before, so my friend wouldn't have to struggle with it.

Once the tank was off I drained the cooling system, removed the pressure cap (also under the tank) and removed the rear coolant hose from its pipe. Getting to the retaining bolt on the rear coolant pipe was pretty difficult. It requires a long skinny 8mm wrench and a lot of patience. It will not unscrew completely from the head as it hits the throttle mechanism, which is not removed without removing the air filters, backing plates, associated plumbing, and the fuel injectors and intake manifold. This I was NOT going to do. I removed the retainer bolt as far as possible, and bent the tab on the coolant pipe a little until I could get it loose.

The pipe required serious persuasion with some long long-nosed pliers, and in the process I nicked up the hose-mating surface a little. I burnished both ends off well with a powered wire brush, removed the burrs I'd made, straightened the tab I'd bent and trimmed it a little so it could go back on straight with no monkey business. I cleaned it up with solvent and put it aside.

I then cleaned the bore in the head out with solvent and scrubbed it really clean so the silicone would stick, finally wiping with dry paper towels. I mounted a new o-ring to the pipe with silicone, slathered on some more silicone (Permatex black label BTW) and shoved it gently back in. I pressed it into the head while my friend struggled to re-tighten the captive bolt. I let the glue set up a while and took a break.

Once the silicone had time to set, I cleaned the end of the coolant hose inside, put some Permatex (orange label) weatherstrip advesive in the end of the hose and clamped it back in place. I let that set up a bit.

Becuase I did not want to run the engine until the silicone had set over night, I was very careful to get out as much air from the system as possible when re-filling it. I wiggled and pinched hoses and rocked the bike side-to-side and back & forth until I managed to get nearly 3 quarts of HondaCool into it, then capped it off. Any extra air will blow out into the surge tank tomorrow, and be replaced by coolant siphoning back when the bike cools off tomorrow night. I hope. I didn't have time to do the front pipe, but it doesn't appear to have leaked hardly at all, and hopefully won't pass any air into the system either.

That other pipe will have to get done eventually, however, and so I'll be going through this process again in the future if my method with the silicone works out. I am confident that it will, and also that the front pipe will be easier to do. also I'll get to drain & refill the system again, removing virtually all traces of the original coolant, as I know the passages cannot not all drain completely with the engine in the bike. At least not unless you want to do some fancy hoist work. ;-)

Anyhow, Baggins is all back together, and I'll take a run to the gas station tomorrow, and if nothing leaks I'll do my usually ride to work and back.


"When in doubt, ride."
Cadd................................Clovis CA
2004 Nomad 1500............"Baggins"
caddmannq at yahoo dot com

Post Edited (CaddmannQ) : 8/26/2007 3:21:14 AM GMT

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 8/25/2007 8:52 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Day 1470
27,981 miles

I changed the o-ring and put sealant on the front cylinder coolant pipe today. This was easier than the rear one I did last week, as the gas tank doesn't have to come all the way off. Remove the seat, speedo, and tank bolts, then lift the tank in the front & shove a wooden block under to hold it up in the front. I put bungie cords from the front tank mount lug to each handlebar to both secure the tank and the bars from flopping. Then I removed the left air cleaner & backing plate & the tiny hose to the fuel injection dashpot. I unplugged both left sparkplug wires & then it was easy to get the hose clamp & pipe mounting bolt off with a little ratchet. (Drain the radiator first!) the sealant is drying overnight so tomorrow I'll find out if the seepage is cured. (Yes, when I sealed the seepage on the rear pipe the seepage of the front pipe did increase. fortunately it never lost more than a couple drips per day, and none of it ever made it to the ground.)

I also changed the front brake fluid & clutch fluid today. Both definately needed it. I inspected the front pads, but they are still in good shape being half worn or less. I've got 4 sets of front pads hanging on my peg board and I may wear the engine out before I use half of them.

Hint to Vulcan owners when changing fluid or bleeding brakes & clutch:

For brakes start with handlebars to the right lock so you don't slop fluid when removing the filler cap. Then when bleeding turn the bar to the left lock but only with the reservoir about half full so it doesn't spill. This puts the ports in the reservoir at the highest point in the system and the air will come right out. Once out it will spit fluid like a fish, so work the lever slowtly at that point.

To do the clutch reverse the sequence, and use a 2x4 under the kickstand to level the bike a bit. Careful with the 2x4 under the stand when turning the bars to the right lock, as it will be almost perfectly balanced and the slightest nudge will topple it over to the right. Having a friend to help stabilize the bike will prevent this.

Finally I changed the rear gear oil, just because I usually change it every oil change and last time I skipped. Factory manual states a 20,000 mile change interval for this, but it only holds maybe one cup of gear oil, and a gearbox rebulid is probably $1500, so it's cheap insurance.

A hint to Nomad owners:

The manual says to remove the left muffler, but it isn'y necessary if you just get two people (or one really husky guy) to sit on the bike and compress the rear shocks. Then the drain bolt comes right out.


"When in doubt, ride."
Cadd................................Clovis CA
2004 Nomad 1500............"Baggins"
caddmannq at yahoo dot com

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 9/8/2007 8:07 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Day 1484
28,146 miles

It looks like my bike has developed the dreaded cam plug seepage. It's not bad (yet) and I'm not going to drop the engine to re-seal them. (Well not without trying something easier first.)

Everybody blames the synthetic oil for these leaks but plenty of guys running dino oil have had them too. I'm thinking that there's not enough breathing in the rocker cases or more likely that they tend to shrink with age and heat. With only 28,000 miles on the bike this comes as a bit of a shock. I've thought of a couple ways to fix this without taking the engine apart. I'm not sure how successful they might be. I'm not just gonna smear silicone over them though.

Since I pulled up the tank and put new o-rings and sealant on both coolant-to-head pipes I'm still smelling a tiny bit of coolant now and then. I have not changed the thermostat yet, but I actually think they last longer out here because of the heat. They get more exercise than in a cold climate. Anyhow, I may do so as I evidently still have some coolant seepage somewhere that I can smell. I just can't see it yet. Perhaps it's at the thermostat housing, or maybe the pressure cap is failing, or perhaps I'm just smelling hot vapors from the surge tank. Whatever it is it's pretty invisible. Nothing that would keep me from riding every day.

I'm still running my used-from-the-junkyard driveshaft, while the good one has been sitting in my toolbox all ready to go. I've been waiting for the rear tire to need replacement before I switch them back, but the Metzler ME880 seems to be outlasting the old Bridgestone Exedra by a wide margin.With about 8,500 miles on it, the rear tire is only looking about half worn out. It's a little over a year old, and surprisingly it looks like I may actually wear one out before I get a nail in it. At least I'm over half way there. I'm certainly getting my $40 out of that used driveshaft.

I finally tightened up the rubber grommets on the rear turn signals, but I didn't cut down the spacers. All I did was remove the bolts and washers inside the fender and slip o-rings over the metal spacers. This tightened the lights up just enough. From the factory it always looks like the rear turn signals are falling off, because the rubber mounts are so slack.


"When in doubt, ride."
Cadd................................Clovis CA
2004 Nomad 1500............"Baggins"
caddmannq at yahoo dot com

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greyboyfan
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   Posted 9/8/2007 11:17 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

 

 Ahhh! the ol' Nomad blog. smile

 

 I have an old friend with a couple yrs. old Nomad thats kind of orange and brown, and, beings he's Cherokee, he thought it'ed be fun to have a big indian chief profile painted on the sides of the tank. and with after market pipes, It does fool anybody who doesn't know anything or doesn't bother to look close. You wouldn't believe how many people stop him to admire his "Indian" motorcycle. Usually it's older guys, They ask "What year is that?"   HAAAA!  He tells 'em "Yeah, this in a '38 model completly restored." They go, "Yep! My brother had one just like that". He just smiles and they just go on their way happy. It's kinda funny.

 Hey! If they are that dumb, he just goes with em on their little trip down memory lane.  turn

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 9/11/2007 9:51 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I see a lot of Vulcans set up to look like Indians. This is essentially the style the Kawasaki Drifter was modeled after, and with a Drifter front fender and saddle bags any Vulcan looks a lot like an Indian.


"When in doubt, ride."
Cadd................................Clovis CA
2004 Nomad 1500............"Baggins"
caddmannq at yahoo dot com

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greyboyfan
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   Posted 9/11/2007 2:38 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
DRIFTER! I'm sorry, You're right. His was a Drifter. My mistake.
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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 9/11/2007 5:52 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Well, they're kissing cousins. ;-)


"When in doubt, ride."
Cadd................................Clovis CA
2004 Nomad 1500............"Baggins"
caddmannq at yahoo dot com

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nonyab
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   Posted 12/19/2007 8:24 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
CaddmanQ: Just going through your blog and looking at some useful and interesting info. Noted on your 4/3/2007 post you had your Nomad in the air on a jack. Wondering what brand jack. I have a 99 Nomad and maybe the frame is different but I could not get a Torin to fit the frame. The lift bar was too narrow for the front and with the engine below the frame would take some modifications to make it work. Also, it would not fit under the bike with it level. Have read a lot of others have had this problem also. Did you have to modify yours to get it to fit? I have found I definitely need to service and maintain my ride and leave the Kaw "mechanics" (?????) to other people's bikes. Thanks, Non
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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 1/19/2008 9:27 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Sorry I missed your post, Nony.

The jack is a Sears Craftsman. It fits under my bike, just barely, because I have a 160 rear tire, and keep the shocks pumped up a bit. When I had a 150 tire, I had to roll the front wheel up on a little board to get the jack under.

It actually lifts under the two cast lifting lugs at the rear of the frame, and the front pad lifts under the crankcase. Many people do it this way & it seems to work fine. There are some instructions on Gadget's Fixit Page for the Nomad on how to modify the jack to only lift the frame, but I don't feel this is really necessary.

Always tie the bike down at 4 points to the jack once you get it up, and use the safety latch in case the hydraulics should leak. so far mune has not, but they all will eventually.


"When in doubt, ride."
Cadd................................Clovis CA
2004 Nomad 1500............"Baggins"
caddmannq at yahoo dot com

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 1/19/2008 9:42 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Day 1617
29,443 miles

Changed the oil & filter today. It's only been 1562 miles, but somehow I thought it had been longer. No problem, as I always like to change the oil when the real cold weather gets here, and it's here. I used 2.75 quarts of 20w-50 Mobil-1 mixed with a quart of 10w-30, as that 20w-50 is just too thick for my taste when it gets into the low 30's.

I put in a new battery three days ago, as the old one was on it's last legs & did not want to start the engine once the temps dropped down to around freezing. It would still crank over just fine, and any bike with points and condensors would have started, but this computerized bike just requires a perfect battery to be happy.

I bought new sparkplugs as well, and will hopefully change them tomorrow. I think I'll forego changing the gear lube, as it usually only gets done every 3000, & the manual says 6000 miles as I recall.

Still running the junkyard driveshaft & it's doing fine. The Metz front tire seems to be wearing a bit faster than the Bridgestone did, but the rear seems to be lasting longer. So far no nails in either, so maybe I'll get to see how long they really last this time.


"When in doubt, ride."
Cadd................................Clovis CA
2004 Nomad 1500............"Baggins"
caddmannq at yahoo dot com

Post Edited (CaddmannQ) : 1/20/2008 4:45:25 AM GMT

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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 2/13/2008 5:46 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Day 1642
29, 832 miles

Finally changed those original spark plugs last night. I could tell too, a little, when I rode to work this AM. Normally I would have never gone 30,000 miles on one set of plugs (on a bike that is) but I'm surprised at how well they held up. The real test will be if the gas mileage goes up a bit.

Now if I could just muster the ambition to change out that fork oil. lol


"When in doubt, ride."
Cadd................................Clovis CA
2004 Nomad 1500............"Baggins"
caddmannq at yahoo dot com

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Mntsnow
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   Posted 4/4/2008 8:59 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Nicely done Cadd. I should have been doing something like this for my M109R. Currently 10 days away from having owned it 1 year and put on just shy of 10K miles in the last year...if the freaking weather would cooperate with me I will have a touch over 10K by my bikes birthday :)........btw Happy birthday to you today as well !
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CaddmannQ
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   Posted 4/12/2008 11:15 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Thanks, buddy. Frankly, without this blog I'd have no record of anything I've done. I keep it backed up offline just in case the site goes *poof* some day.


"When in doubt, ride."
Cadd................................Clovis CA
2004 Nomad 1500............"Baggins"
caddmannq at yahoo dot com

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Tros
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   Posted 4/12/2008 11:41 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
CaddmannQ said...
Thanks, buddy. Frankly, without this blog I'd have no record of anything I've done. I keep it backed up offline just in case the site goes *poof* some day.

That's something I'm hoping to do with any vehicles I own from now on --- I want to get in the habbit of documenting service records.


"People take different roads seeking fulfillment and happiness. Just because they're not on your road doesn't mean they've gotten lost."

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Smitty
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   Posted 4/12/2008 6:58 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

Tros, you can set up a simple Log Book on your bikes or whatever,  I set them on my h/guns, the reloading I do, to the m/cs.  I use a simply three eye-sheet book with info on the bike from the start, S/N & whatever to finally each time I so much as hear a sound I aill put down the date & into, to any changes made on the bike.  I can go back to them anytime & find out what I did.  It does not require a lot of writing but some data that one can look back on some time later on.

I have chaps ask me what loads I used when shooting such & such a weight & shape of a bullet & possibly what I used in almost vintage Green Dot I use to obtain good results on.  I go back to my reloading data & have it for them next week or if they have an easy phone number then it is that or their E-mail.  Not that I have given up Green Dot, but let us say it was Winchester 452AA that has not been made for the past 5 or more years-----I have the best loads for said bullet tips be it 38 Spl, or 45ACP, though possibly I did not trust 452AA with 9X19 reloads.

 



Remember all the others on the road are crazy & out to kill you.

Post Edited (Smitty) : 8/18/2009 6:45:09 PM GMT

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CaddmannQ
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Total Posts : 17674
 
   Posted 5/1/2008 7:19 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Smitty, the big advantage of this method to me is that people ask questions all the time and I can simply point them here where they can read for themselves, rather than having to look up info and spew it back to them all the time.

Also, I can search for things much easier than with paper.

Finally, making a backup copy is much easier, including the photos. It fits on a CD & is very portable too.

But nothing really beats the portability of the internet. Some guy in China wants to see my photos? I just point him here rather than mail stuff half-way around the globe.

It's probably going to be impossible for my grand children to imagine what communication was like before the internet.


"When in doubt, ride."
Cadd................................Clovis CA
2004 Nomad 1500............"Baggins"
caddmannq at yahoo dot com

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CaddmannQ
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Total Posts : 17674
 
   Posted 5/17/2008 10:17 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Day 1736
30,684 miles

In preperation for next month's Kawasaki Nomad Worldwide (western USA) rally in Zion Nat. Park I tore the bike down 2 days ago and started checking everything of interest.

First, a disappointment: I figured to get at least another 3000 miles from the rear tire, not changing it until this winter. Unfortunately, on close inspection it was showing some cupping I didn't like, plus there were two glass cuts in the tread. They weren't major cuts, but riding across the Mojave desert in June you want really good tires. But I had bought a set of new Metzlers "just in case". (There's nothing worse than messing up your vacation because you need to order a tire at the last minute.) Anyhow, I'm getting better at mounting tires, or just getting luckier because it went right on. Also: in the Summer, when it's 110 F in the garage, tires go on and off much easier than in the winter when it's 35 F because the rubber is much more flexible and elastic when hot.

Front tire looks great. Brakes look good, front about 50% & rear over 75%. Brake hoses look good as well.

Decided that since I had the bike torn down I'd lube the driveshaft & swingarm, and I'd wanted to re-shim the sideplay on the swingarm since the neoprene shims were just too soft. I cut two shims out of UHMW Polyethelene on the drill press, 0.075" thick, 1.06" I.D. x 2" O.D.. with new swingarm seals installed, total sideplay was 0.168". After shimming it was 0.018, which is about twice what I was hoping for. I need to find some 0.084" stock.

While the swingarm was off I checked the driveshaft. I was srill running the used Vulcan 88 driveshaft I had bought at a junkyard, and the U-joint is still fine. I decided to swap the original shaft back in, as it has the cross-drilled spider U-joint from Team Motorsports, which can be greased.

There appeared to be a small amount of oil at the bottom of the right shock. Unfortunately, these shocks are about $400 each. Fortunately you can add oil to them. If I notice any more leakage I'll put thicker oil in them and drop the rebound dampening a notch or two. I always thought the compression dampening was a bit soft anyway. I may have damaged the shock last summer when I bottomed out the suspension hard on highway-1.

Spent a lot of time cleaning and polishing, but I could have spent 10x what I did.

I also bought new iridium plugs, one step colder, plus new front wheel bearings and seals. Haven't changed them yet though. I thought the front bearings were getting noisy, but now I just think it's the brake pads dragging a little whenever I lean the bike over.

The rubber cam plugs are still seeping very slightly. It doesn't seem to have gotten any worse since last summer though so I haven't done anything about it. If it gets any worse I may try flushing them with solvent & soaking them with Crazy Glue. This will cause the rubber to swell & stiffen & so may stop the seepage. Changing those seals would take at least a whole day for me, having to remove the driveshaft again, drop the engine & remove the tank, plus a whole lot of other stuff, drain coolant, change oil, bla-bla-bla. I just don't want to do it.

No other evidence of coolant or oil leaks seen, but it's obvious that my clutch safety switch is starting to fail. Sometimes the engine will not crank over if the bike is in gear. After jiggling around the switch it will, and then it won't. Normally this is no problem, as you can always start the bike in neutral, but if you stall it in traffic, you gotta shift twice, rather than perform a rolling start.

I should still change the fork oil, but it's not gonna happen this weekend. That's another tedious job on this bike, requiring removing & inverting the fork legs. There needs to be a better way.

I thought the seat pan (plastic of course) was flexing a bit under my weight, so I added some more rubber spacers under it to distribute the load. I think this flexing has made the seat less comfortable than it could have been. I think I'll get some fleece seat covers before I hit the Mojave in June though.
 
I also changed the gear oil in the final drive. I've been using Mobil-1 75w-90, which I think is a little wimpy actually. There was also some minor seepage of the pinion seal. Anyhow, I fortified the new gear oil with a glop of Mobil-1 synthetic grease. Next time I take the rear tire off I'll have a new pinion seal ready.


"When in doubt, ride."
Cadd................................Clovis CA
2004 Nomad 1500............"Baggins"
caddmannq at yahoo dot com

Post Edited (CaddmannQ) : 5/18/2008 5:46:12 AM GMT

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CaddmannQ
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Total Posts : 17674
 
   Posted 5/25/2008 1:57 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Day 1744
30,798 miles



I recently bought a rear bumper for Baggins and I decided to put it on yesterday as it was raining. Quite unseasonable in fact.



Anyhow I modded it a bit, because I was totally unhappy about the design of the mount under the fender. (I bought this bumper used, BTW.) Maybe I'd be less anal about it, except that a Nomad fender is like $600 (!), and I want this "bumper" thing to do more than just look cute. If I'm adding weight to an already heavy bike, it's gotta be functional too. Kawasaki calls this bumper a "fender trim" BTW. I can see why. In their incarnation it wouldn't stop a determined hamster from denting your fender.

This is the bracket Kawasaki gives you.

It's plenty thick & sturdy, but the design is all wrong! First, it hangs the bottom rear of the bumper from the two tiny turn signal mounting bolts (!) which are simply attached through the fender. If the bumper's function is to protect the fender, why in the devil would you attach it to the fender? Second, it hangs almost vertically when mounted. As such, it provides about zero resistance to horizontal impact, say like someone actually using this bumper as a bumper. Maybe Kawasaki thought we were going to use a bumper jack under it ? Why is their bracket vertical? Answer: It came out first for the Vulcan Classic and because Classics don't have anything else to mount it to!

I bent the (nearly) vertical tab on the chrome bumper down horizontal, and fabricated this quickie bracket to attach the bottom of the bumper to the frame. It's gonna provide about 10 times the impact resistance of Kawasaki's arangement.

It ain't pretty, but you can't really see it unless you get on the ground. I'll paint it black later, but I left it white initially so it would show up in the photo, and because I wanted to make sure it fit before painting.



It could be more rigid if I'd made it completely flat, but it will protect the fender much better now. Eventually, when I have the time to get some welding done, I'll just weld a tab on the crossbar. I'll cut the "Z" off flat on the bumper, and make a straighter bracket without the hokey "P" clamp arangement. But my buddy with all the welding equipment is out of town right now so this was the best I could do without welding & on short notice. Still, it's dang sturdy for what it is, compared to what it would have been.



I still have to mount the front bumper (which hasn't arrived yet) the chrome tail for the front fender, the iridium sparkplugs, and the cam chain adjustment extenders. Hopefully I'll have all this done before the Nomad rally next month in Mesquite, Nevada.


"When in doubt, ride."
Cadd................................Clovis CA
2004 Nomad 1500............"Baggins"
qmann at asdiengr dot com
http://hooligancruisers.proboards102.com

Post Edited (CaddmannQ) : 9/29/2011 1:51:26 PM GMT

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CaddmannQ
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Total Posts : 17674
 
   Posted 6/2/2008 6:11 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Day 1751
30859 miles
 
Evidently I'm on a chrome binge, because I installed the Fire & Steel rear front fender tip on my bike. (Last Sunday actually, but I forgot to post.) I'd say it's extra weight for nothing, but it does cover a couple stone chips in the paint. Easy to install. Only two screws...

But of course, nothing is ever easy for me.

I did a trial fit first. The instructions say to drill 1/4" holes, but the screws are smaller than 3/16". I drilled them to 11/64"

The instructions say to clean and wax the fender first--so it doesn't rust, evidently, because I can easily see where this thing's gonna trap dirt and water. It's doesn't fit really perfect, and nowhere's near water tight. Nor do they give you a gasket for it. I almost made a gasket, but....

They give you little nylock aircraft nuts, and the screws are too short to actually engage the nylon part. A gasket would have prevented them from reaching the nuts at all. Hardware stores are all closed Sunday evening of course.

Grrrr....I gritted my teeth and forged on.

I bedded the entire perimeter in silicone gasket sealer. I siliconed the nuts, washers, and screws down too. Of course, with half a tube of Permatex silicone on it, the screws could fall right out and it's never gonna come offa that fender.

Of course while putting the silicone-smeared nuts on I dropped one. Picking it up off the floor, I found a glob of dirt & dog hair glued to my finger, which transfered neatly to my fender. While hurrying to tighten the screws so I could polish the siliconized dog hair off my fender before it dried on I dropped the other screw, and proceded to dog-hair the other side of the fender as well.

Fortunately it was a dry day, and silicone drys slower in low humidity conditions, so it all came off neatly in the end.
 
It looks nice, but in the end I wish I'd waited for the longer screws and attached a mud flap under it as well. It would help keep the crap off the regulators and lower radiator if I had one.


"When in doubt, ride."
Cadd................................Clovis CA
2004 Nomad 1500............"Baggins"
caddmannq at yahoo dot com

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