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mredding1979
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   Posted 4/16/2011 8:04 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
How does everyone deal with those crosswinds that hit you as you are out and about? I always hate coin into a corner and getting blasted right as I begin a turn.
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ChrisVTX1300S
2003 VTX1300S

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   Posted 4/16/2011 2:00 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Other than not riding when it's windy, there's really no way to avoid the occasional cross wind. Just rely on your instinct and auto-correct as needed when they hit you.


03 VTX1300S - Orange, V&H Big Shots, Darkside, Brake Away Cruise, Kuryakyn Cruise Pegs, ISO Grips, Magnum Mirrors, Light Bar
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Smitty
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   Posted 4/18/2011 10:48 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

It is strictly something you learn as a m/c rider compared to a cage driver.  As a gust hits you one tends to lean into that wind, but correct it when the wind is not there in a second or so.

Large 18 wheelers, ATs, to buses can create the same as well SO you simply learn sort of on your own.  I never have seen anyone give up riding just because they live in a windy sort of area.  They might bitch to fellow riders, but after a while not much is said about gusty winds as is sort of a part of life when riding a m/c.



Remember all the others on the road are crazy & out to kill you.

Post Edited (Smitty) : 5/2/2011 1:47:43 AM GMT

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WhiteKnite
Exploring Korea



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   Posted 4/18/2011 11:00 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I knew the headwind would be quite different, but I was really surprised how much more the cross-winds throw me around on the cruiser than my sportbike and even old standard. I mostly just used body lean to correct on the CBR but I actually have to anticipate with handlebar input on the new bike. If you have a large windscreen on a cruiser it will exaggerate the wind a lot too.

You just basically keep the bike going the right direction, similar to fighting road undulations and ridges. It can startle you and catch you off-guard sometimes but it becomes second nature in time. Just gotta try to stay calm and look where you want to go.


2010 Hyosung GV650

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Smitty
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   Posted 4/18/2011 4:37 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.

There is one of the advantages of a sportbike as WhiteKnight mentioned he did well with his sportbike, but the cruiser felt like a real fighter.

We learned this back in the late 48 to 52 when we had road racers with even partial fairings to street bikes as well for the fairing, just a shell like form, actually sliced its way through the wind be it at the side or at the front.  In fact we obtained better fuel milage & had to watch when pulling up behind a cage rider that when easing off the throttle was NOT ENOUGH for in prior years with skelton bikes they were being slowed down by the air on the hwys.


Remember all the others on the road are crazy & out to kill you.

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Easy Rider 2
Central Illinois / Central Florida

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   Posted 4/18/2011 6:59 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
WhiteKnite said...
but I actually have to anticipate with handlebar input on the new bike.
Trying to "anticipate" wind gusts on a bike can be dangerous......as it often leads to over-correction and/or guessing wrong about what is about to happen next.  This applies to other vehicles too but is more pronounced on two wheels.
 
I hope you can get comfortable enough with your new bike quickly so you don't feel that you have to do that anymore.


 
 

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WhiteKnite
Exploring Korea



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   Posted 4/19/2011 2:25 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Easy Rider 2 said...

Trying to "anticipate" wind gusts on a bike can be dangerous......as it often leads to over-correction and/or guessing wrong about what is about to happen next. This applies to other vehicles too but is more pronounced on two wheels.


I hope you can get comfortable enough with your new bike quickly so you don't feel that you have to do that anymore.


Good catch, actually just my bad wording. I should have said something like "I actually have to anticipate using some handlebar inputs on the new bike." It would be kind of hard to actually anticipate wind gusts and I could definitely see that causing some over-correction all over the place. The first time a big gust hit me I got pushed halfway across my lane because I was trying to just lean into it like on my CBR, and it wasn't enough. It has been really, really windy here for the last week. Its already pretty much automatic on the new bike by the way, just took some adjusting to in the first couple hundred km.


2010 Hyosung GV650

www.youtube.com/KniteWulfe

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ZX Rider
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   Posted 6/4/2011 11:54 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
On the Gold Wing I was shoved into the next lane. Scared the c**p outta me. Never to ride that monster again. High profile vechicles don't fare well in high cross winds. Unless your the size of Arnold S.


Asphalt, the greatest tattoo remover.

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mrmarklin
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   Posted 6/4/2011 7:25 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
A gusting wind is far more dangerous than a steady crosswind per se.
 
I have been almost knocked into another lane in the Altamont Pass on Hiway 580.  This area is notorious for very high winds, and gusts. 
Huge windfarms on the hills.cool  
Another time I was on the Hi-rise section of the San Mateo bridge, and in stop and go traffic, my detachable windscreen blew off due to wind gusts.
 



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2008 Harley-Davidson Crossbones

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louemc
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   Posted 6/4/2011 8:22 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
mrmarklin said...
A gusting wind is far more dangerous than a steady crosswind per se.
 
I have been almost knocked into another lane in the Altamont Pass on Hiway 580.  This area is notorious for very high winds, and gusts. 
Huge windfarms on the hills.cool  
Another time I was on the Hi-rise section of the San Mateo bridge, and in stop and go traffic, my detachable windscreen blew off due to wind gusts.
 


Ya Would of loved the High Rise of the San Mateo Bridge...when the Loma Prieta Quake hit...it was the thrill ride of a life tme..Priceless cool


 Focus the forces, Be The Force

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Harley Davidson
98 Harley Davidson Dyna Wide Glide, 2004 Roadking



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   Posted 6/11/2011 5:10 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
That's odd, I figured that a sportbike would be worse in a crosswind, based on my Sporster riding vs my Wide Glide or my Roadking, as the Wide Glide and my Roadking handle crosswinds pretty good, but I tell you, I had a few close call on the Sportster, to the point where I would not even ride it sometimes if it was real windy, but on my bigger bikes, I never give it a second thought, usually.

I blamed the Sportster for being taller and lighter, thus the wind seems to blow it around worse. At anyrate, in the wind, I am always ready to do a quick counter stear to correct incase of a gust, and and that went double for the Sportster, as I have had the wind gusts blow me 3 ft to the side or better before I could react, when I rode it, which also  taught me  to not ride very close to the downwind line or highway edge, so as to have a buffer zone to give me that precious reaction time, if needed for correction. 


 
     

Post Edited (Harley Davidson) : 6/12/2011 12:19:08 AM GMT

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ZX Rider
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   Posted 6/14/2011 6:12 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
My Triumph is hard to control in cross winds but nothing compared to the Gold Wing, Sail Ship. The 14 has a very low profile which makes cross winds just annoying. The scooter get pushed around for it's size, most likely, the low mass.


Asphalt, the greatest tattoo remover.

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Wilcon
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   Posted 11/6/2011 9:37 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Keep your hands and arms loose and don't over grip the controls. I have never been blown out of my lane with this technique. It's not usually the wind that moves you it's your reaction on the bars to the gust, the looser your arms and hands the less movement you encounter.


I put alot of effort into making the rear of my bike look good. It's what everyone sees.
-me

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Andy VH
Where is the earth shattering kaboom!?



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   Posted 11/8/2011 6:30 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Wilcon makes an excellant point. If you are over-tight on the bike, the bike itself will not be able to self correct for the line you set it on. If you are tight in the hands and arms you actually resist the natural action of the bike to self correct.

But a few other things to consider. Cross winds generally don't come "out of nowhere", meaning there are usually lots of other clues leading up to the event. Cross winds are common on blustery days, so expect them. Read the environment as you ride, look for what the trees are doing as a reference, look for what vegetation/weeds are doing. Any time a tree line or some other natural wind block stops, expect the crosswinds. Any large open flat is ripe to produce crosswinds. A crest in the road acts like a chimney to direct the prevailing winds possibly in a manner to produce a crosswind where it otherwise would not be.

Its all part of riding.


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