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ditchbanker
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   Posted 8/26/2011 4:56 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
OK, reference my other post, I've done some looking and found some bikes I feel very comfortable on. However, a lot of these bikes have tube tires. I've changed more than a few tubes on dual sports, but these are bikes that are light enough to push up on the side stand and shove a log or piece of hard luggage under to get the wheel off the ground.

When you guys are on these big cruisers and you get a flat, what do you do? Is that a day, find a truck? Is there a trick for getting these huge bikes off the ground on the side of the road? Right now I'm having to cross over half the bikes on my list off because I can't figure out how I'd change a tire. Any advice?
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jon
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   Posted 8/26/2011 6:01 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
ditchbanker said...


When you guys are on these big cruisers and you get a flat, what do you do?


for tubeless tire, i would use a kit like this or similar to fix it then ride the bike to the shop to get the tire replace:

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Easy Rider 2
Central Illinois / Central Florida

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   Posted 8/26/2011 6:07 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
jon said...
for tubeless tire, i would use a kit like this
Good answer but that was NOT the question.
 
For me, who has tubed tires, it would be "call AAA time".
 
 


 
 

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Easy Rider 2
Central Illinois / Central Florida

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   Posted 8/26/2011 6:14 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
ditchbanker said...
 Right now I'm having to cross over half the bikes on my list off because I can't figure out how I'd change a tire. Any advice?
That might be a valid concern but in my 40+ years of riding, I've never had a tire go completely flat on me out on the road. 
 
I'll probably PAY for saying that on my next road trip. freaked
 
For me, it's call AAA time.
 
You are right in that very few people would want to tackle changing out a tubed tire on the side of the road.
 
My advice is: Don't worry about it if you find a bike that you like in every other respect........but join a roadside service just incase.  smilewinkgrin
 


 
 

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el SID
merely a man equipped with a bag a seedless grapes



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   Posted 8/26/2011 7:59 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
If you get a flat on a bike,you arent changin it unless you have a tool bag from hell. Your going to need tire irons, all the tools to remove the wheel,and some where to do it,cause the side of the highway isnt the place. I have roadside assistance. It removes the problem and headache of it all. Theres ways to do it,use the center stand, some tie downs, and a plank of wood. But for the trouble and possible mishaps,it isnt worth it.  
 Get the bike you like and some roadside asst. and ride, ride, ride......


  the best bike out.... is the one your on...
current hacks
1996 honda vfr
track hack? 2012 tuono rsv4 aprc? who knows,cant decide....
1973 kawasaki h1
1998 suzuki rm 125

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jon
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   Posted 8/26/2011 10:32 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Easy Rider 2 said...
jon said...

for tubeless tire, i would use a kit like this
Good answer but that was NOT the question.




op asked, "When you guys are on these big cruisers and you get a flat, what do you do?"

i answered his question by saying, for tubeless tire, i would use a kit like this or similar to fix it then ride the bike to the shop to get the tire replace

he clearly asked, "what do you do?"

was that *NOT* the question he asked?
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MichaelD
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   Posted 8/27/2011 4:09 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I love the spoke wheels but I will never own a tubed tire again on a street bike. I live 2 miles from a paved road and have had my share of nails in my tires. I carry a plug kit and a Air Chuck Elite Tire Inflator that uses a co2 cartridge for my tubeless tires. A can of fix a flat or slime would probably work to get you home on tubed tires. As far as a tubed tire get road side assistance in case of a tear in the tube.


In God We Trust, All Others Must Submit Objective Evidence


South Central Kansas

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ditchbanker
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   Posted 8/27/2011 7:53 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I was specifically curious about tube type tires, but am thankful for EVERYONE's input, thanks.

Fix a flat might work, with roadside repair.

I'm sure my experience with dual sports biases me, but I've had LOTS of flats with tube tires. With a light bike I love tubes. When I get done replacing the tube, the tire's pretty much good as new. Yes, I did carry tools to remove the wheel, 3 tire irons and a pump with me. Also found out that baby powder works as a convenient lube (still dry) to help set the bead. Did it just off the shoulder of the freeway once, but usually dirt roads.

Thanks for the input, again. It seems that most of the bikes that I like have the more standard position, and these bikes, for whatever marketing reason, seem to be more likely to have wire spokes.
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MichaelD
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   Posted 8/27/2011 8:50 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
When it comes to a duel sport or dirt bike All I have is tube tires but they are a easy fix with basic tools. Heck Ive rode home on a flat at one time or another through a field or dirt road lol.


In God We Trust, All Others Must Submit Objective Evidence


South Central Kansas

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el SID
merely a man equipped with a bag a seedless grapes



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   Posted 8/27/2011 9:38 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Yeah Ive replaced tubes on the rm in the middle of no where U.P. Michigan. But wouldnt try it on the vfr or h1. If a dirtbike falls no biggie,a road bike, mega weight to dead lift off the ground. You know ditch,you could put on some mags if you were so inclined,also depends on the bike as well... I love the look of spokes but I hate the rest. I have 7 dirtbikes in the family, 1 for everybody plus 1 on the road. Spoke tuning blows! lol pain in the arse. Dont even get me started on cleaning.....Cant wait till the twins get old enough to do it themselves.....
Side note,I use the monkey butt powder,same stuff basically but,funnier,manlier.....It really works well though,top tip.


  the best bike out.... is the one your on...
current hacks
1996 honda vfr
track hack? 2012 tuono rsv4 aprc? who knows,cant decide....
1973 kawasaki h1
1998 suzuki rm 125

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louemc
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   Posted 8/27/2011 10:00 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
There is so much more to this...including the way a tire goes flat when a tube is punctured, vs the way a tubeless tire goes flat, when it does (excluding the actual blowout examples that can be traced back to the hopelessly stupid riders)...the issue of tube vs tubless is one of don't be a dumb ass...there is only one sane choice, and that is tubeless.

Now a bike can have spokes and tubeless tires at the same time...when the rim is designed for it...BMW has had it, and a couple others.


 Focus the forces, Be The Force

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jon
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   Posted 8/27/2011 10:45 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
ditchbanker said...


I'm sure my experience with dual sports biases me, but I've had LOTS of flats with tube tires.


i've owned several cruisers with tube and tubeless tires and fortunately, i've never encountered a flat on a tube tire. if i did, i would do the same: find a way to temporarily fix it with a kit then take it to the shop. the weight of the cruisers i've own ranged from 500-750lbs., with no center stand so not going to try to hoist/jack it up on the road unless i really have to. i also have roadside service now so i would do what Easy Rider 2 suggested too if it's not worth it to fix it with a repair kit.

since you have had lots of flats with tube tires, might want to see if these kind of prevention products are available for the bike models you're talking about:





if not, may have to look into buying or making a jack compact enough to carry but sturdy enough to lift a big heavy cruiser safely.
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Easy Rider 2
Central Illinois / Central Florida

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   Posted 8/27/2011 11:03 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
jon said...
was that *NOT* the question he asked?
No.  You need to read the WHOLE post to get the full meaning. smilewinkgrin
 
 


 
 

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Well Enuff
--- Regaining my sanity --- one ride at time



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   Posted 8/28/2011 11:38 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
ditchbanker said...
OK, reference my other post, I've done some looking and found some bikes I feel very comfortable on. However, a lot of these bikes have tube tires. I've changed more than a few tubes on dual sports, but these are bikes that are light enough to push up on the side stand and shove a log or piece of hard luggage under to get the wheel off the ground.

When you guys are on these big cruisers and you get a flat, what do you do? Is that a day, find a truck? Is there a trick for getting these huge bikes off the ground on the side of the road? Right now I'm having to cross over half the bikes on my list off because I can't figure out how I'd change a tire. Any advice?
Ditch was obviously asking about these bikes with tube tires. But, Jon, I appreciate your bring the pocket tire plugger to my attention. I think I'll add that to my kit.
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jon
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   Posted 8/29/2011 12:15 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
sure WE,
 
here's a demo vid for the visual learner:
 
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martinjmpr
08 Triumph Scrambler



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   Posted 8/29/2011 8:32 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
FWIW AMA offers its MoTow roadside assistance if you join with automatic renewal. I used it once when I got a flat on my front tire. Fortunately for me, it went flat while parked.


Martin
 
Englewood, CO (Denver suburb)
 
UJM (Universal Japanese Motorcycle) Fanatic
 
Previous Bikes:  '69 Honda CL450; '74 Honda CB750; '83 Honda 550 Nighthawk; '92 Yamaha Virago 1100; '83 Yamaha Maxim 750; '84 Kawasaki ZN700 LTD; '01 Triumph Thunderbird 900; '82 Kawasaki Spectre 750
 

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mrmarklin
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   Posted 8/29/2011 8:54 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
If one has a flat on a Harley with a tubed tire, it's tow time. Harley does make a centerstand for the Softail, but it's not that easy to change a tire on a Harley, and in any event, it's the tube that's usually the problem. The tube's an easy enough fix if one has a kit and it's not torn. I've owned several bikes with tubed tires, and never had a problem in thousands of miles, however.

As an aside, most Harleys don't even come with tool kits.eyes


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2008 Harley-Davidson Crossbones

Post Edited (mrmarklin) : 8/29/2011 3:58:20 PM GMT

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el SID
merely a man equipped with a bag a seedless grapes



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   Posted 8/29/2011 8:37 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
But they have garage door openers right Mr .M? lol unreal.. murder,they get away with murder.


  the best bike out.... is the one your on...
current hacks
1996 honda vfr
track hack? 2012 tuono rsv4 aprc? who knows,cant decide....
1973 kawasaki h1
1998 suzuki rm 125

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martinjmpr
08 Triumph Scrambler



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   Posted 8/31/2011 7:03 AM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
el SID said...
But they have garage door openers right Mr .M? lol unreal.. murder,they get away with murder.

My Triumph, which had an MSRP of ~ $7500, came with an allen wrench.  That's all the "tools" you got (and the primary purpose of that allen wrench was to be able to take off the seat.) 

OTOH, my 24-year-old Kawasaki KZ750N Spectre not only had a seat that was hinged and opened with a key lock on the side cover, it also came with a fairly extensive (albeit cheap) tool kit that was probably sufficient for basic maintenance chores. 

Now that I think about it, almost every Japanese motorcycle I've ever owned has come with a basic tool kit. 


Martin
 
Englewood, CO (Denver suburb)
 
UJM (Universal Japanese Motorcycle) Fanatic
 
Previous Bikes:  '69 Honda CL450; '74 Honda CB750; '83 Honda 550 Nighthawk; '92 Yamaha Virago 1100; '83 Yamaha Maxim 750; '84 Kawasaki ZN700 LTD; '01 Triumph Thunderbird 900; '82 Kawasaki Spectre 750
 

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talon
she rides



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   Posted 8/31/2011 12:58 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I carry Green Slime and an air pump that attaches to my bike's battery. Makes a mess, but it will get you down the road to the fixit place.


Ride it like you want to ride tomorrow.

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MichaelD
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   Posted 10/1/2011 7:19 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Interesting Might be worth a try on one of the dirt bikes.
jon said...
sure WE,


here's a demo vid for the visual learner:



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</PARAM><EMBED height=345 type=application/x-shockwave-flash width=420 src=http://www.youtube.com/v/OCrRXYWm1Hg?version=3&hl=en_US allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always"></EMBED></OBJECT>


In God We Trust, All Others Must Submit Objective Evidence


South Central Kansas

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Deacon Blues
The Imaginary Director



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   Posted 10/2/2011 3:37 PM (GMT -7)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
All of the bikes I've owned have had tubeless tires.

And you don't HAVE to go with spoked rims on cruisers. There are LOTS of places that will sell you alloy rims, for nearly any street bike.

Also, as has been pointed out, modern spoked rims can be sealed so they can run tubeless tires.


"Lane splitting will never be accepted in those areas where driving is considered a martial art."

Current Ride: 1992 BMW K75RT "Sif"
Past Rides:
1985 Yamaha FZ750 "Diablesse"
1987 Yamaha FZ700 "Pandora"
1979 Yamaha XS750 "Cerberus"

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